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What is Business Communication?

communication in business

Knowing how you communicate helps you understand yourself and others better while making you a more effective and productive interactor in the world.

What is Business Communication?

Business communication refers to any communication that goes on within a professional setting. This includes presenting information in meetings, brainstorming in a team, or problem solving with your coworkers.

Why is Communication in Business Important?

Whether you are a large or small business owner, good communication is always good for business. Effective business communication can also help with employee engagement.

A survey was done with 400 different companies and 100,000 total employees, and they found that each company lost an average of $62.4 million in profits because of poor communication. That’s a lot of lost profits all because of bad communication. But these losses can be easily prevented by taking the time to learn about how you and those around you communicate.

Types of Business Communication

types of business communication
 

By understanding the different types of communication you can know better how to utilize the different communication forms to your advantage. There are 2 primary forms of communication, verbal and nonverbal. Verbal is going to include talking out loud to each other, whether in person, on the phone, or over a video call. Nonverbal includes body language and writing.

Verbal

Verbal communication is the standard face to face type of communication. It can also be communicating through things like conference calls or a phone call. Choose your words and tone of voice wisely and appropriately for the person and the situation. Don’t use terminology they won’t understand, and don’t overload them with lots of verbal information all at once. We tend to only remember the last parts of what we hear, so either make that the most important thing, or include note taking.

The trick to verbal communication is taking the other person’s perspective into account so that they will understand your words as you intend them. This is why reading articles like this one, to understand others better, is paramount to becoming an effective communicator.

Nonverbal

Body language is all about how you physically present yourself, and what others can observe or assume from your outer appearance and demeanor. Our facial expressions can also offer subtle cues to an observer of what we’re thinking or feeling. If you want to seem open and confident, don’t cross your arms over the front of your body, practice good back posture, make eye contact, and dress appropriately for how you wish to be received.

Technical Communication

One form of communication you may need to be familiar with in your job is technical communication.

Technical communication can be when you need to talk about technology or other specialized subjects in your field.

It can also be when you use technology, like slides, to communicate effectively.

And finally, technical communication can also be when you need to communicate instructions. Giving instructions comes with it’s own set of rules and guidelines so that you can be clear when offering a step by step process.

In many professional fields employers and employees alike will need to have a measure of skill utilizing technical communication in order to effectively share information in their area of expertise.

Communication Styles

communication styles
 

Many people have researched and studied the different styles of communication we all use. They have found differences in communication styles between genders, generations, and cultures.

Multiple researchers have attempted to categorize communication types into 4 or 5 main groups, but the truth is, communication is such a vast and complicated aspect of human interaction that truly defining it into a handful of categories is near impossible. For the sake of simplicity we will divide communication styles into 2 sections that can often overlap.

Logic-Based

People who base their communications in logic can get a bad rap from other people for being heartless or cold. But details and figures are just the way they best understand the world around them, just as an emotion-based communicator make sense of the world through their intuition. Logical communicators are a major asset to your business as they will keep your projects focused.

  • Focus on facts, numbers, data
  • They make their decisions based on figures rather than how they feel about the choices
  • They are great researchers
  • Detail oriented
  • They like the process of things and breaking large tasks into small ones
Emotion-Based

Emotional communicators like to rely on their intuition to make decisions. They make sense of the world around them through their instincts and emotions. Emotional communicators can be a great asset in connecting your business to your customers and creating the kind of environment that welcomes consumers and coworkers alike.

  • Rely on intuition, instinct, gut feelings
  • Focus on the big picture goal or main idea of what you want to accomplish
  • They are often creative and good at brainstorming
  • Social
  • They care about human connection and thus have strong interpersonal skills
  • They are often the diplomatic peacekeepers in their group
Passive

Passive communicators don’t communicate very well. They are the people who go with the flow. If you have a peacekeeper personality you might be guilty of being a passive communicator. They have trouble expressing themselves, or voicing their own opinions and feelings.

This kind of communication is a problem because it can lead to a build up in stress and it keeps you from offering your insights. It can also lead to misunderstandings in communication because others are forced to assume your thoughts or stance on things rather than hearing it from yourself.

The benefit of a passive communicator though, is that they are great listeners and can be great confidants and peacekeepers in the office.

Aggressive

Aggressive communicators are the opposite of passive communicators. They are on the other side of the spectrum, where they always say what’s on their mind. They are often described as demanding, authoritarian, and dominate and control the conversation.

The problem with aggressive communicators is they can be seen as rude, have a hard time listening or letting others get a word in edge-wise.

But the benefit of aggressive communicators is that they can make great leaders and get things done. They aren’t afraid to delegate.

Passive-Aggressive

Passive aggressive communicators are inwardly aggressive communicators, and outwardly passive. They have so much they want to say, but never do, whether out of fear or a lack of control. But their aggressive communicator side breaks free in subtle ways, but the communication is never completely clear or direct.

Assertive

The most ideal form of communication is assertive. When you are an assertive, you communicate openly without dominating the conversation too much. Assertive communicators have found the balance between passive and aggressive communicating.

They know when to listen, and when to speak up.
If you are interested in finding out what type of communication style you naturally favor, you can take this communication style quiz from glassdoor.

Business Communication Skills

skills and techniques
 

Now that you have a better understanding of the types and styles, we can move on to the techniques you can use to better your communication practices.

Don’t be afraid of silence

You can learn a lot from silence. Silence gives the other person in the conversation full opportunity to finish their thoughts, or add important details. This way you don’t miss any important contributions the other person might have.

Being comfortable with silence will also help people feel more comfortable and at ease conversing with you because it teaches you to be a less nervous conversationalist if you’re not worried about filling silence.

Ask questions

Learning to ask the right questions can be the key to really effective communication. Asking questions also shows you have personal interest in the topic or people a part of the conversation.

Stay current

Being learned will help you to have more meaningful conversations, and it will make you a more helpful asset in general in your workplace.

Manage your stress

Nothing leaves you more muddled in the head than when you’re stressed out. When you manage your stress properly, your mind will be clear, focused, and you’ll be better able to make decisions and think clearly.

Avoid filler words

Filler words are any words, phrases, or sounds that get used too often in speech. Many times filler words are subconsciously used to fill pauses in between thoughts. Becoming comfortable with silence will also help you with this communication technique.

Some examples of filler words include: um, like, uh, ah, ok, you know, yeah.

Learn and use people’s names

People really appreciate it when their names get used and remembered. By putting forth an effort to learn and use names you’ll make a friendly and amiable impression on anyone you meet. Showing that you can remember names also shows those around you that you have a good memory.

Use “I” statements

Using “I” statements instead of “you” statements is a great communication tactic. Using “you” in your speech can sometimes come off as demanding, or accusatory, which will cause others to clam up or get on the defensive when talking to you. So rephrase your speech to avoid using “you” too much so that you don’t come across as accusing.

For some other tips and tricks to communicating effectively, check out a business communication PDF:

Communication is a giant part of good business. At your job you’ll need to brainstorm, work in groups, and solve problems by communicating effectively with your coworkers, subordinates, and superiors.


READ MORE

If you need help finding a career first read, “How to Choose a Career.”

If you need even more tips for great communication read, “What is Communication?

Read a book all about technical communication, Technical Communication: a reader-centered approach

Check out this business communication book, Speak with No Fear


How to Become an Uber Driver

uber driver

Should you become an Uber or Lyft driver and are you missing out? Passenger fares have never been lower, but the jury is still out on whether the ride-sharing gig is worthwhile for its drivers. We’re going to cover not only how to get in on the ride-share driving business, but how much you can expect to earn as well.
 

 
Ride-sharing services are one of the fastest growing companies of our time. Ride-sharing apps appeal to potential drivers because they can come from all walks of life, they can be self-employed, and they get to be in control of their own hours. For passengers the appeal of ride-sharing services is the convenience of hailing and paying for their ride all on their phone.

Ride-hailing companies have really grown into a giant business—Uber alone exists in 63 different countries and is operating in over 700 cities. They’ve also recently broadened their platform to include not just car services but bikes, scooters, food delivery, and even freight. In the future they also hope to add air taxis and driverless cars to their many services.
Needless to say, the ride-sharing app business is growing and here to stay.

You’re probably wondering now how you can get in on this flexible form of self-employment and never answer to a boss again! But before you download the app, quit your job, and hop in your car, hear us out, because becoming a driver for a ride-share business may not pay as well as you’d think.

How to Become an Uber Driver

First, to become an Uber driver you must meet the following requirements:

  • Meet the minimum age to drive in your city
  • Have at least one year of licensed driving experience in the US (3 years if you are under 23 years old)
  • Have a valid US driver’s license
  • Meet vehicle requirements (an eligible 4-door vehicle)

Second, if you meet these requirements then you share the following documents:

  • A valid US driver’s license
  • Proof of residency in your city, state, or province
  • Proof of vehicle insurance if you plan to drive your own car
  • A driver profile photo
  • Must be a forward-facing, centered photo including the driver’s full face and top of shoulders, with no sunglasses
  • Must be a photo only of the driver with no other subject in the frame, well-lit, and in focus; it cannot be a driver’s license photo or other printed photograph

Third, you complete an online screening that reviews your driving record and criminal history. And that’s it! After your application is accepted you can download the uber app and start taking rides.

How to Become an Uber Eats Driver

Uber Eats is a delivery partner that has teamed up with many restaurants that don’t typically have their own delivery services. As an Uber Eats driver you deliver food orders made via the Uber Eats app. Becoming an Uber Eats driver is similar to signing up to become a driver. Once you sign up to be an Uber driver, upload the required documents, and complete the online screening you simply do the following to start receiving delivery requests:

  1. Go to your account
  2. Select vehicle options
  3. Accept delivery terms

However, when delivering for Uber eats you can also use a scooter or bike instead of a car. In order to drive either of these options for your deliveries you have to meet the following requirements.

How to Become a Lyft Driver

Uber’s rival Lyft is a newer ride-hailing company out on the roads right now. To become a Lyft driver you can visit the Lyft website to fill out their application and start their process. You’ll basically have to do the following:

  1. Fill out the application
  2. Vehicle Inspection
  3. Background check
  4. Meet the requirements of your city
How to Become a Driver without a Car

At this point you may be wondering, but how do I become an uber driver without a car? How do I become a lyft driver without a car? If you don’t have your own car to drive with, Uber has partners that can rent a car to drive with. Lyft has something similar with Lyft Express Drive. With this you can use a rental car and return it at any time, with things like insurance and standard maintenance included in the rental price.

How Much Money Do Drivers Actually Make?

How much you can really make as an Uber driver is riddled with caveats. Yes, you can earn good money from driving during surge hours and getting tips from your passengers, but then other things, like all the costs that go into having and running a vehicle, will dent your earnings. Because ride-share drivers are technically self-employed they have to take on all the costs necessary to run their business, and this is where ride-share drivers experience major disappointments in their earnings with apps like Uber.

How Much Uber Drivers Make

There are many people out there that would love a lucrative way to be self-employed, and there are many aspects of businesses like Uber and Lyft that draw in new drivers every year. There are estimated to be about 833,000 Uber driver participants in just one year. Uber has also said that their drivers can earn $75,000 to $90,000 a year, while the typical taxi driver only makes about $30,000 a year.

If these numbers were true to what most drivers are actually making then why would almost half of all drivers only stay in the business for less than a year before dropping out of the game? It is because most Uber drivers don’t end up seeing earnings this high.

In reality Uber drivers make an average of $15.68 per hour, which means Uber drivers make about $7.84 per ride, and about $109.76 per week if they work all 7 days. Surveys done by Earnest have also found that Uber drivers make $364 per month on average, which would mean that Uber drivers make an average of $4,368 per year. Uber does give drivers the ability to earn extra with surge pricing. This is when passengers fees go up during higher density hours.

How Much Lyft Drivers Make

Lyft drivers make pretty similar numbers but the difference might be just enough to make you switch apps. Lyft drivers make an average of $17.50 per hour. This means that on average they make about $8.75 per ride, and about $122.50 per week if they work every day. Earnest also found that Lyft drivers tend to make an average of $377 per month, which would mean that Lyft drivers make an average of $4,524 per year.
 
earning stats
 

Average Earnings by City

Not all cities are created equal when it comes to the demand for ride-hailing services. How much work you can get and how much you’ll get paid on average will depending on what city you work in. But remember, many of the best cities to work in for ride-share drivers are also more expensive cities to live in, and a higher cost of living will affect your earnings as well.

The 10 BEST cities for ride-share drivers are . . .
  1. Honolulu, Hawaii at $25.55 an hour
  2. Seattle, Washington
  3. Long Island, New York
  4. Pittsburg, Pennsylvania
  5. Westchester County, New York
  6. San Jose, California
  7. New York City
  8. Minneapolis, Montana
  9. San Francisco, California
  10. Cincinnati, Ohio at $19.18 an hour
The 10 WORST cities for ride-share drivers are . . .
  1. Buffalo, New York at $9.74 an hour
  2. San Antonio, Texas
  3. Tulsa, Oklahoma
  4. Oklahoma, Oklahoma
  5. Indianapolis, Indiana
  6. Tampa/St Petersburg, Florida
  7. Springfield, Missouri
  8. Houston, Texas
  9. Raleigh/Durham, North Carolina
  10. Akron, Ohio at $4.94 an hour

As you can see, drivers in some of the bottom tier cities aren’t even making minimum wage.

Average Earnings by Vehicle Class

If you were wondering how much drivers tend to make according to their vehicle class we found that information too. Overall they found that most drivers make the following according to what class of vehicle they’re driving:

  • UberX = $13.70 an hour
  • UberXL = $14.84 an hour
  • UberSELECT = $14.85 an hour
  • UberBLACK = $24.87 an hour

It would then seem like the higher class your vehicle is the better you’ll get paid, but you have to remember that you are the one paying for the more luxurious car. Passengers also pay more to ride in the higher-end vehicle types, which will affect how much demand there is each day for the vehicle class you offer.

The Cons of Being an Uber or Lyft Driver

There are actually many reasons these promising numbers don’t become a reality for most Uber drivers. First of all, there is the nature of how Uber drivers are employed (or technically not employed) which affects their pay and benefits (or the lack thereof). Then there are the many other costs that fall on the driver to pay and manage on their own. Finally there is the matter of location that dictates how much work is even available in a driver’s area.

Independent Contractors

Drivers are considered independent contractors, which means that they technically are self-employed. Sounds great right? Who doesn’t want to be their own boss? But there are a number of disadvantages to being self-employed.

Since drivers are independent contractors they have to take care of their own benefits, like insurance, and they are also in charge of all the costs of maintaining their vehicle. Below are some other cons to being an independent contractor for Uber:

  • Because you aren’t a W-2 employee, Uber is not required by any laws to pay its drivers minimum wage.
  • Because you aren’t a W-2 employee, you have to cover your own Social Security and Medicare taxes. Officially employed W-2 workers will typically only pay part of these taxes with each paycheck, while their employer pays the rest.
  • You are considered self-employed, but you still work for a business that will control and regulate aspects of your “self-employment” and control the percentage you get paid.
Demands on Your Own Pocket

Because you are only getting a percentage of your earnings, while the ride-sharing company takes the rest, this makes the personal costs of running your driving business all the more impactful on your wallet.

Instead of all the proceeds of your business going to you and your business, the ride-share app companies take a cut, and they get to decide how big a cut they get. Below are just a few examples of all the costs you have to pay out of your own pocket to run your driving business:
 
insurance
Insurance
Not only do you have to pay for your own health insurance—since ride-share companies won’t consider you an employee and provide any benefits—but you also have to pay for your own car insurance.
 
car payments
Car payments
Ride-share companies won’t provide you with a vehicle the way that other taxi companies do for their employees. Providing yourself with a vehicle to drive and work in is also all on you.
 
vehicle maintenance
Vehicle maintenance
Any maintenance, repairs, and general upkeep that your vehicle will need in order for you to drive is completely your own responsibility. And since you are driving your vehicle for your work it is going to need much more regular maintenance.
 
gas
Gas
You are not reimbursed for what you spend on gas. Business insider found that drivers can spend up to $150 on gas just in a week, and the more you work, the more you’ll be spending on gas each week.
 
tolls
Tolls
If you drive through any tolls your passenger will likely pay an added amount on their fare, but you will be responsible for taking care of the toll fee upfront.



Overall

A recent study was done by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in May 2018 and they found that ride-share drivers may not be any better off than taxi drivers. They found that self-employed drivers only made up 35% of the driving business, and at an average $14 an hour they’re not even making a taxi driver’s salary of $30,000 a year. Because of this it seems ride-share driving truly does belong in the gig economy as more of a part-time job for extra cash, than a full-time occupation.

If working for yourself means a lot to you and the projected numbers we’ve outlined don’t look that bad, then maybe ride-share driving is still the gig for you. You can also always take advantage of Check City Title Loans to help your car stay in business. But it may also be a side gig that needs some revamping by those in charge in order to be made truly worth-while for the drivers once again.



READ MORE
Read more about the new Uber CEO and how he’s been implementing changes in the company.

Learn more about Uber and how it compares in the gig economy today, “Uber and the labor market: Uber drivers’ compensation, wages, and the scale of Uber and the gig economy.”

Read yet another interesting study about how Uber is changing the ride-share economy, “The Competitive Effects of the Sharing Economy: How is Uber Changing Taxis?

This article is a part of our “How Much Do Professions Pay?” series. Check out some other articles in this series to learn more about other professions and what they pay:

How Much Do Teachers Make?

How Much Do YouTubers Make?

How Much Do Nurses Make?


4 Investments Worth Making

worthwhile investments
 
With the Up’s and Down’s the economy has experience over the last several years, many people have been left asking the question, “Are there any truly safe investments that can be made these days?” In today’s post we’ll cover the top 4 investments that are still worth making.

1: A House

house investment
 
A home is one of the most worthwhile investments you will ever make, and what an investment that will be. It may take you decades to pay off your house, but the nice thing about houses is that they increase with value over time.

The value of real-estate rises over time like the value of a car falls, it’s predictable. Your investment will pay itself off and more should the need ever arise to move or sell.

With that in mind, any land you may own will have the same effect. As the amount of available land decreases, prices for land that you own increase.

It’s the law of supply and demand. The less supply available, the more someone is willing to spend when the demand rises. With that being said, be wise when it comes to making your home purchase as well as the improvements that you make during your time living there.

As we learned in 2007 there can sometimes be artificial inflation that happens in the housing market, buying during those times can lead to severe financial turmoil. In addition to being careful when you buy, be careful what improvements you make, understand that some improvements such as landscaping don’t give you as much bang for your buck when it comes time to sell as a remodeled kitchen or bathroom.

2: A Steady Stock

stock investment
 
Certain stocks have shown steady, predictable growth over the years and are therefore, safer to invest in. Oftentimes the growth is slow, but it always moves in the positive direction.

When you plan on putting aside money for a number of years, consider investing it in a steady stock instead of a bank. Your money will appreciate better in an investment rather than a holding cell.

3: An Education

education investment
 
If you don’t have a post-secondary degree yet, get one. On average, salaries take drastic turns for the better with every degree you get. You are worth more when you have learned more. You come to the table with more to offer, and are therefore a competitive employee. If a company wants you, they’re going to have to pay to keep you.

That’s the beauty of an education. It represents quite the financial investment, but the jobs and salaries that follow are well worth the time. They more than pay themselves off with time. If you have one already, see if there’s anything more that you can be doing to increase yours, ie. attending conferences and keeping up with recent literature.

4: Invest in a Friend

invest in people
 
There is untold power in investing in the people around you.

Studies have shown that there is a correlation between the people that give more and the people that earn more. Some say it comes from a social responsibility. When you’ve been given so much, you are responsible to give to others. The more you give, the more you’re blessed with. Others will say it’s a weird coincidence. Science can’t figure it out, but the phenomenon remains.

The more you invest in the people around you, the more money you are likely to make. You will never know though until you give it a shot. On top of that, you’ll be doing something to make a difference in people’s lives. Whether you give them a fish and feed them for a day, or teach a man to fish and feed him for a lifetime, the results will be the same.

For one, you’ll help someone, someone that needs help like you’ve needed in your life. For another, you’ll share an excellent example to those that might continue the legacy themselves (like your children).

Finally, and least importantly, you’ll feel great about what you did—changing someone’s life. Invest in the people and community around you. This doesn’t always mean you invest monetarily. Many times it will simply be getting to know someone new, offering a listening ear, or showing someone that’s ignored that you care. No other investment will give you the return of investing others. This is the best investment you will ever make.


READ MORE
Take a look at “Planning Investments while Budgeting” to learn more about how you can include your worthwhile investments in your budget.

11 Important Qualities to Have When Changing Careers

career-qualities
 

 
In order to keep up with the changing job market and stand out from all the other eager job candidates, it helps to have the qualities of a successful professional. Whether you are changing careers or looking to start one, these skills are what every employer in every field looks for when interviewing candidates. In order to succeed in today’s changing job market, workers have to foster new skills and hone in basic ones. Whether you are 25 or 40, starting your career or changing it, here are some great career changing qualities that will make you stand out from other job candidates.
 

 

1: Work Well in Groups

Be a team player! In almost every work environment you will have to work with others to some degree. Employers want to create a productive and peaceful work environment where coworkers not only get along, but work well together. So when you demonstrate your ability to work with a team, you increase your attractiveness as an employee. Working well with others also creates a sense of unity and helps productivity in the workplace.

Understanding Generational Differences

When entering the workforce you will quickly see that there are often generational differences between coworkers. Anyone from Generation Z to Baby Boomers may be present in your next place of work and—as Sarah Sladek has found in her studies—there are distinct cultural differences between each generation. In order to avoid generational misunderstandings, it is important to get along and understand your coworkers as well as help them understand you. After all, a peaceful work environment is a productive work environment.

It’s easy to have a lot of prejudice toward people who see so differently from you. One of those differences we all can experience is generational. There are currently 4 defined generations listed below from oldest to youngest:
Baby Boomers (born between 1946 and 1964)
Baby Boomers have been raised to follow tradition. They care about families and economic security.
Generation X (born between 1965 and 1981)
Generation X was raised during the women and civil rights era. Their time was before childcare programs which gave them the nickname “latch-key children,” meaning they were raised to be self-sufficient and independent thinkers. They care about a work-life balance and seeing a positive impact from their work.
Generation Y or Millennials (born between 1982 and 1995)
According to media expert Sarah Sladek, Generation Y is a tech savvy, globally minded generation that isn’t joining, buying, networking, learning or engaging like other generations. This generation experienced many firsts, firsts to use technology. They want frequent feedback, want variety in their work. They avoid tradition for the sake of tradition. They’re eager to learn and lead. And they like to reexamine to keep things relevant and future focused.
Generation Z (born between 1996 and 2009)
Generation Z is the newest and youngest named generation right now. They are also referred to as the connected generation because they haven’t known life pre-internet. They are a creative, entrepreneurial group that care about social causes.
 
For some people differences can be a huge roadblock in a working relationship. This often happens because people take differences as a personal offence. But we all see with different eyes and when accepted, this can be a team’s greatest advantage. You alone can’t experience and see everything, but together, with many perspectives, your team can SEE and therefore DO much more than any individual.

Generational differences are also not the only difference you’ll come across in the workplace. Everyone was raised differently, comes from different places, backgrounds, and beliefs. Knowing how to interact and work with all kinds of different people will make you a useful asset to any working team, and an all-around better human being.

So let people be different. Let everyone bring their own unique selves to the table and your arsenal for combatting projects and problems will be that much more impressive and diverse.

2: Giving and Receiving Criticism

In the workplace you’ll need to learn how to embrace and use criticism to your advantage. You also might need to know how to effectively give criticism as well. You should embrace every bit of criticism as an opportunity for insights on how to improve. Even the worst given criticism can have something useful that you can take advantage of. It may be hard to hear small, nitpicky ways you can improve. But when you allow yourself to use criticism, you can develop new skills that will help you climb the professional ladder and improve yourself as a person.
criticism

How to Give Feedback

Sometimes your job will require you to give feedback to others. The whole point of giving feedback is that you want to see something improve. Whether it’s actions or a project, you are simply invested in making something the best it can be. Your feedback needs to be helpful, effective, and clear. Here are 4 quick steps to make sure you don’t leave someone more confused by your feedback, rather than giving them the insight and direction you intended.
First, ask what IS working.
This isn’t just to make people feel good about what they are doing, or soften the blow of what you don’t like, though it can do these things too and that’s an added bonus. But if people don’t know what is working then they might end up changing things they shouldn’t. Make sure they also know what is working.
Second, ask what’s NOT working.
This part of giving feedback is rather obvious. But remember to not let yourself make the interaction overly emotional or personal while giving feedback about what isn’t working.
Be clear and specific.
Vague criticism is not helpful criticism. A subordinate or team member can’t improve if you are too ambiguous in an attempt to not hurt feelings. For example, if a team member is working on a design, don’t just say, “It could be better.” Instead figure out what specifically about it isn’t working. Is it the color? Is it the image they chose? Is it the font style? Be as specific as you can about what is and isn’t working.
Finally, help them implement your feedback.
Once you’ve figured out what exactly isn’t working you can become even more specific by suggesting solutions to their problem. So don’t stop at “the color isn’t working,” but help think of what could work. Maybe the color needs to be lighter, or darker, or a different color all together. In any case, don’t leave them to brainstorm solutions all alone. Giving suggestions can also help further solidify their understanding of what insights your criticism is trying to give.

How to Receive Feedback

In almost any workplace you are going to receive feedback about your work and performance. Here are a few steps to follow anytime you are receiving criticism:
Shut up and just LISTEN.
A lot of times, when receiving criticism about something we’ve worked on, our initial gut reaction is to talk, to explain ourselves, to help them see what we were seeing, or to defend our work and therefore ourselves. But when you are talking you are missing out on the feedback the other person could be giving if you let them have the floor.

It may help to look at your work not as YOUR work, but as THE work. Separate your work from yourself and allow it to be its own entity that you and the critic are both just working on together.
Wait until the end to ask questions.
Waiting until you know they are finished to ask questions is the best way to make sure you don’t miss anything. Asking questions will also help you understand their feedback more. Feedback is only helpful if you have a clear understanding of it, so don’t be afraid to ask questions at the appropriate time.
Turn negatives to positives!
Sometimes criticism isn’t so constructive. Other times even constructive criticism can just come with a lot of negatives. If the feedback is poorly given, focus on what good you can take from it to be better.
Thank the critic.
Make a habit of thanking your critics for their feedback. Even if it was poorly given, thanking them can help them chill out and realize they don’t need to be hostile to get through to you.
Implement the feedback.
Make a plan going forward of how you will implement the feedback. It was meant for your benefit so take full advantage! This is where you take the wheel back again and start driving forward.

3: Flexibility

Be flexible. The workplace today is changing rapidly. Rather than being angry and resistant of changes, develop flexibility. Flexibility is a winning strategy in today’s job market. It is also important to prioritize and be flexible with your time in order to take care of your own well-being, while still being productive.

If you have trouble with change, here are some tips on how to deal with change better:
flexibility

Stay Grounded

Find something in your life that isn’t changing to focus and lean on while you acclimate to the new thing.

Understand the Reasons

Seek to understand the goals for the change so you can more easily get on board. More than likely, if your workplace is changing something it’s because they have reason to believe it will make things better. Understanding the estimated benefits of this change will help you see its value and give you a reason to want the change too.

Keep Up to Date

Don’t get comfortable being stagnant. Make a habit in your everyday life to learn and try new things. This will give you an arsenal to deal with change as you actively pursue it in your own life. If you are staying up to date on learning new things, then some changes may not be that big of a shift for you. In a way, you’ll be prepared for changes in advance.

Strong Support Network

In your personal life it’s important to have a support network. This can consist of people, hobbies, and practices that you can lean on in times of change and need. It’s also important to have support from fellow coworkers and team members when changes cause you and fellow workers to lose footing. Be there for others and they’ll be there for you.

4: Problem Solving Skills

Be a problem solver. Employers look for workers who can work across lines and be an active participant in the running of the business. When you are willing to learn expertise and solve problems that arise, you increase your level of knowledge and your value to the company.
problem-solving

Understand the Problem

You can do this by defining the problem, listing all the obstacles and related variables, and defining the root cause of the problem. Understand the whole picture so you aren’t missing any important details that may be the key to the solution.

Reverse Engineer

Sometimes deconstructing the problem will help you find the root cause, which may be the key to the solution. Also, thinking about things backwards can give the new perspective necessary to see the solution.

Communicate

There will probably be people and other departments that you’ll need to communicate with in order to understand the problem completely. The knowledge of these other people may be the missing link you need to formulate the entire solution.

5: Confidence

Be confident. When you project a sense of confidence, you center yourself. Your sense of confidence will have a profound effect on your coworkers. When you appear confident, your coworkers and managers will be willing to follow your lead.
confidence

Change Your Perspective

People aren’t just born with or without confidence, it’s something that you build for yourself. You can grow or diminish your confidence through the perspective you choose to have.

Grow Thick Skin

Part of self-confidence is having thick skin. You want to build up a layer to keep yourself from taking everything personally and allowing every little thing to chip away at your self-esteem.

Try treating yourself like you would a friend, or loved one. Seeing yourself from this detached perspective can help some people be kinder and take better care of themselves. Find opportunities to congratulate, compliment, and reward yourself.

Look Inward

Deconstruct Your Self-Image.

Be more self-aware. Take note of your triggers to know what builds and what diminishes your self-confidence. Be aware of what you obsess over and ruminate about. What failures do you focus on? List the things that disappoint you about yourself. For example, if you say “yes” even when you want to say “no.”

Do the 100 days of rejection challenge. Jia Jiang started this challenge. You purposefully make crazy requests of people in order to be rejected once a day for 100 days. His purpose was to desensitize himself to rejection.

Reconstruct Your Self-Image

Visualize yourself as you want to be. How you view yourself in your own mind’s eye is where your self-confidence stems from. Create an image of yourself that you are proud of.

Practice seeing yourself as equal to those around you.

Use positive affirmations. Affirmations are when you say things out loud to make them more real, to train your brain to think a different way about yourself.

Practice leaving your comfort zone.

Practice more self-care.

Make realistic goals you know you can accomplish. You might want to go to the gym every day, but you know you can get yourself to the gym at least twice a week.

Look Outward

Create boundaries. Part of self-care is creating your own boundaries and respecting yourself more by adhering to the boundaries you need.

Forget yourself. Pay more attention to those around you instead of worrying about how they see you. Help others, volunteer, and focus more on the things outside of yourself.

6: Competence

Being competent is all about your ability to learn new skills and navigate uncharted territory. It is about having a level of self-sufficiency and not being helpless in every new situation. Competence will take you farther and farther in your job as the things your workplace wants you to do are going to vary more. Competence also comes in different levels.
competence

Level One: Confidence

One trait of a competent person is having confidence in your abilities. When you pair confidence with competence, you have a winning strategy for completing tasks that may be new to you. You can gain this first level of competence by doing new things frequently. You might not have any experience using Microsoft Excel, but you can have experience in doing new things. There are a lot of tips, tricks, and skills you can learn by doing new things that can transfer over to other tasks as well.

Level Two: Learn

The second level of competence is being able to learn and figure new things out on your own. Skills like this come from knowing how to research and study independently. In school you learn this skill with individual assignments. For example, you need to get rid of an endnote on a document, but you don’t even know what an endnote is! Because you do know how to use the internet and user forums, you can figure out how to do it on your own.

7: Good Work Ethic

Develop a strong work ethic. Work ethic can encapsulate a lot of different things. Ultimately work ethic is the idea that hard work is important. If you have a good work ethic that means that you put in good, valuable, high quality work and that you care about the kind of work you are doing. It also encompasses how you carry yourself in the workplace.
work-ethic
Here are some characteristics of those who have a good work ethic:

  • Be focused
  • Have an appropriate work-life balance
  • Be professional
  • Adhere to workplace etiquette
  • Be dependable
  • Be self-disciplined
  • Be organized
  • Be productive
  • Be efficient
  • Be responsible
  • Care about the work you’re doing
  • Care about quality work
  • Determination
  • Accountability
  • Humility
  • Integrity
  • Discipline
  • Team player
  • Loyalty to company
  • Time management, be punctual, deadlines
  • Honest
  • Respectful

8: Handle Pressure

Work well under pressure. Today’s workplace is a pressure cooker of stress. When you develop a sense of calm amongst the crazy, you exponentially increase your ability to rise in the workplace.
pressure-stress

Take Care of Your Body

Try to treat your stress the way you would treat the common cold. Stress can also affect your body. Everyone gets colds, that’s why it is called the common cold. Everyone also gets stressed out in the same frequency. When you have a cold you can either do nothing and let it escalate to a sinus infection, or you can do things to take care of yourself and get over the cold quicker.
Get More Sleep.
On a regular day you might be able to get away with 5 to 6 hours of sleep and still function normally during the day. But when you are sick you need to sleep more than that. In the very least you need to be getting a full eight hours of sleep each night, maybe a little more. When you’re stressed you also need more sleep than normal to recuperate. You’ll want to also make sure you are getting quality sleep:

  • Make your room cold.
  • Have plenty of blankets.
  • Go to bed and wake up at the same time.
  • Give yourself an extra half hour of falling asleep and waking up time.
  • Unwind before bed, relax, meditate, take melatonin, or drink some cold water.

Eat Healthy.
Make sure you are eating healthy. When you have a cold sometimes you lose your appetite. Sometimes when you’re stressed you can also lose your appetite, while other people’s appetite grows. You have to fuel your body with the nutrients it needs to keep up and keep running during times of sickness or stress. You have to give your insides a fighting chance by providing the right fuels.
Exercise.
Unlike when you’re sick it’s actually good for you to exercise like normal when you’re stressed. Exercise is a good natural medicine for stress.

Take Care of Your Mind

Reach Out.
Reach out to others and let them know what’s going on with you. Sometimes simply talking out our stress can help alleviate it. Go out with people in your support system to have some fun and treat yourself. You can also formulate a team to help you with whatever’s stressing you out. Sometimes we stress out because we have a task that’s too big for one person and we need to accept that and ask for help.
Prevent Burnout.
One thing that affects a lot of worker’s stress is actually burnout. There are a lot of things you can do to prevent and treat burnout, but one thing that helps is to change things up. Changing your routines or taking a much needed vacation can be just the medicine you need to reach full capacity again.
Organize Better.
If your tasks are all planned out in doable chunks then you can tackle your workload better and stress about it less. For instance, you’ll know you don’t need to worry about task B today because you have plenty of time allotted on Thursday to tackle that item. Effective organization gives you back control. Also try keeping a list of all the things you’ve finished so you can have an accumulating list of accomplishments to remind you of how productive you’ve been.

9: Time Management

Manage your time well. You can be the best employee in the world, but if you constantly miss deadlines due to poor time management, you undercut yourself. So, learn how to allocate your time for each task wisely to increase your marketability. Time management skills will not only help you be more productive, but it will also help you take care of yourself better.

  1. plan your month
  2. plan your week
  3. plan your weekend
  4. plan your day

time-management

Some Time Management Tools:
  • Monday.com is great for managing team jobs.
  • Toggl is great for keeping track of how you use your time.
  • Google or Microsoft Tasks are great for making and organizing your to-do lists.
  • Bullet journals are great agenda for the creative spirit or if you want to organize a lot of different things in one place.
  • Trello is a great app if you like to organize with post-it notes.
  • Mind Meister is a great tool if you like to organize in a map or thought-web form.
  • Hard copy calendars are great for a big picture visual.
  • White boards are also great for a big picture visual.

10: Communication

Be a communicator. When you communicate well, you create a sense of harmony and competence in your team and in your office. Good communication is a valuable skill that should be developed no matter where you are on your career path.

Nonverbal Communication

Includes things like your body language and demeanor. You can practice good nonverbal communication with good posture and being an engaged listener.

Verbal Communication
  • Be respectful
  • Be relevant
  • Be specific
  • Be focused

positive-attitude

11: Positive Attitude

Develop a positive attitude. Nothing is less attractive than someone who doesn’t want to be on the job. Whether you hate or love your job, develop a gratitude and a positive attitude to keep morale up!
 
Along with having an overall positive attitude become invested in your work. It is yours to do and how you do it and your attitude toward it, will reflect you more than it reflects your job.






READ MORE
Listen to Jia Jiang’s TED Talk, “What I Learned from 100 Days of Rejection” to learn about what he learned from the 100 days of rejection challenge.
 
Read the Mayo Clinic’s article, “Job Burnout: How to Spot it and Take Action” to learn more about managing burnout in the workplace.

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