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How to Write a Resume

make a resume

Resumes are a very important part of the job application process.

A resume is often the first impression you’ll make on an employer and can be what gets your foot in the door and gets you that interview!

Explore this Guide:

Job seekers everywhere are panicking about how to make an effective resume so they can start seeing success from their job searching. Even if you’re just starting out in your field you still want a professional resume that will clearly show any hiring manager what you can bring to the table.

What is a Resume?

A resume comes from the French word, résumé, meaning outline. Now we spell it without the accents and use it to refer to an outline of our work history, expertise, and skills.

Resume is pronounced re-zeh-may, or “re-zə-mā” if you understand the phonetic alphabet. Either way you can easily listen to the pronunciation of the word at Merriam-Webster.com.

Resume Objective

The objective of a resume is to show a potential employer, an easy-to-read, brief outline of why you qualify for the job. They want to see a quick glance at your career, accomplishments, and what skills and qualifications you’ve gained so far.

It is a formal document showing your professional life thus far, that a potential employer uses to make an educated decision about whether you merit an in-person interview or not. When creating a resume you’ll want to make sure it includes all the information an employer would need to make this decision.

Create a Master Resume

It’s a good idea to create a master resume where you simply write everything you could ever put on a resume. This can also be considered a curriculum vitae (CV)—a lengthier version of a resume that isn’t meant to be an overview, but instead a thorough outline of all your experience, certifications, awards, achievements, projects, and publications. A CV or master resume, is meant to be a complete history of your academic and professional career, endeavors, and accomplishments. You want to keep a copy of your master resume, or CV, because different jobs are going to necessitate you include different information, depending on the job.

For instance, if you’re applying for a job where you’ll be designing someone’s website, you won’t need to include the cashier job you had as a teenager. But if you’re applying for a job in customer service, then the employer will want to know that you have that customer service experience as a cashier.

You also only want your resume to be a page long, but a resume with absolutely all the experience you’ve ever had in your life is going to eventually be longer than a page, so keeping all this information in one place on your master resume is a good idea to have as a reference.

resume example

Resume Sections

There are a few key sections that go into every professional resume. Once you have a master resume to work from you can start putting everything into these main sections.

Personal Info

Somewhere near the top of your resume, you want to put your name on the center stage of your resume so the employer can easily know right away who they are looking at. Then you can kind of introduce yourself briefly by including a personal bio section that may list your personal interests and hobbies. If you’re including a cover letter on the front of your resume, you can also put this personal introduction there instead.

Contact Info

You’ll also want to include your preferred contact information on your resume. This information is usually so that they can contact you in case they want to offer you a job interview, so make sure you put down the best way for them to contact you for this. Usually this includes your phone number and email address.

Your email address on a resume should be simple and professional. If you don’t already have an email username with your name instead of a TV reference, then it’s time to make one for professional purposes like this.

You can also include other ways for them to get to know you and see your qualifications if those apply for you. If you have a personal website, or an online portfolio you can include that here too. You can also include any professional accounts you have, like your LinkedIn profile.

Experience

Here is where you outline your job history. You don’t necessarily need to include every job you’ve ever had, sometimes it makes more sense to show the work experience that most applies to the job you’re applying for now.

You also want to list your work experience in reverse chronological order, meaning that the job you had most recently goes first, and the oldest job experience goes last. This way you are putting the most relevant information, the most recent and therefore most applicable information up front.
When listing each job you’ll want to include the following information:

  • Job title (the title you had at this job)
  • Company name
  • Location
  • Job description (what were your main duties at this job, and what did you accomplish there)
Education

This section is where you outline your education. Many people have questions about what to include and not include in the education section, like when do you stop putting your high school education on your resume? Once you have a bachelors or associates degree you are usually ok to stop including your high school education on your resume.

Your high school education is a basic education that everyone receives, so there really isn’t anything specific about it that applies to your future job. And once you’ve officially gained some form of higher education an employer can easily assume you also have a high school education, but it’s what you did in your higher education, what you studied and learned specifically there, that interests them now.

  • When listing your education you want to include the following:
  • The name of the school
  • The years you were there
  • What degree you have (associates, bachelors, masters) and in what

If you haven’t finished college yet you can include your estimated future graduation date and what you are studying, meaning your majors and minors.

Achievements

You don’t have to just put down jobs that you’ve had though, also put down any other achievements, accomplishments, awards, or community involvement that might be important for employers to know. If you’ve published anything before here is the place to list that. Any volunteer work you’ve done. Any licenses, certificates, or other special training you may have, including if you speak another language.

Skills

When making your skills section the first thing you want to do is look into what skills are involved in the job you’re looking for. Job ads usually list the kinds of skills they are looking for in an applicant. If any of these skills apply to you be sure to include them.
The skills section should include both hard and soft skills.

Hard skills are specific abilities and knowledge that you have, like knowing how to use Photoshop.

Soft skills are useful attributes, like being organized or friendly.

Then, if you have room, don’t just list these skills, but provide examples to show how you do indeed have these skills. These examples can also be included on your cover letter instead, where you’ll have more room to tell key experiences that prove you have these skills.

For example, if one of your skills is that you know how to use Photoshop, you can also say that you used Photoshop to design a poster in your most recent job. Or if you list that you are organized, you can briefly talk about how you created a new filing system at your last job.

Design a Resume

You can make your resume on Microsoft Word, on Google Docs, or even online. Both Microsoft Word and Google Docs have free-to-use resume templates that can also work as good examples of how to professionally format your resume.

Resume Template Websites

How you design your resume is how you’re going to make your resume stand out. But this doesn’t mean you should make your resume flashy, in fact you should do the opposite. Your resume’s audience doesn’t want to be distracted by too many colors or graphics, they want to focus first on the information that is most important, so center your design around the information itself.

Create a Path for the Eye to Follow

You want your resume to be easy to read. One way to accomplish this is to create a path for your reader to follow. We read left to right, so this path tends to make a kind of Z shape on the page.

Make it Organized

Use bullet points to help organize your lists. Use headings with a clear heading hierarchy so the sections and subsections are clear.

Use a 10–12 Point Font Size

This way your font size won’t be too small to read, but it also won’t be silly looking by being too large.

How to Make a Resume for a First Job

If you are making a resume for a first job then you may not have a lot of experience yet to fill out your work history. A resume for someone just entering the job arena is often called an entry-level resume or a student resume if you are still going through school.

But the experience section of your resume isn’t just for your work history. You can put all kinds of other useful experiences there as well. You can list programs, clubs, and organizations you’ve been a part of, or volunteer work you’ve done. For example, you may not a previous job to list in the experience section, but maybe you were the president of the horticultural club, or the lead flutist in the concert band. You can replace your work experience with these types of high school experiences instead.

Another approach you can take to fill out your resume as an inexperienced student is to make your resume more skill focused than experience focused. If you can’t list any jobs than you can list different skills you have and describe how you gained those skills.

You can list your high school experiences in the same way you would list a job, including the following information:

  • Your Title (Volunteer, Club Secretary)
  • Company/Organization Name (National Honors Society)
  • Location
  • Description (what were your main duties, what did you accomplish)

How to Make a Resume for College

If you’re in college, or freshly out of college, you may also run into a unique problem when creating a resume. Your experience section is also going to look different because you may not have a lot of jobs to list. But college provides tons of exceptional experiences that you can include in a resume instead of jobs. You can list internships you’ve done, or apprenticeships. You can talk about capstone classes and the major projects and research you did for these key courses, and show how these classes have prepared and trained you for a job. You can also talk about any programs, clubs, and organizations you were apart of during your college career.

In the accomplishments section, be sure to include all the certifications you’ve received while in school. Today, successfully obtaining degrees and certificates from your college classes can mean a lot to a potential employer. If you received any awards, special honors, or published your work in a student journal you can include these kinds of accomplishments as well. You can even include your GPA in your college resume if you have a particularly high GPA to boast about.

How to Make a Cover Letter for a Resume

It is always a good idea to include a cover letter when you send an employer your resume. A cover letter is formatted like a formal letter consists of these main points,

  • Your name
  • Your contact information
  • The date
  • Professional greeting
  • A brief paragraph about yourself
  • A paragraph or two for key experiences where you prove your skills
  • Conclusion
  • Professional closing

To create a winning resume all you have to do is follow the advice in this article and remember the whole point of a resume—to show what you have to offer in a brief, clear, straightforward way. Meanwhile, if you’re in between jobs and need some financial help, feel free to check out Check City’s Personal Loans.

READ MORE
Check out another great article about writing a resume, “How to Make a Resume for a Job.”

Read another Check City article about getting a new job, “New Year, New Job.”

How to Choose a Career

how to choose a career

What career you choose determines what major you study while in college. It influences what life you can afford and what you spend so much of your time doing each week of your life until retirement.

Explore this Article:

  1. Understand Yourself
  2. Research Options
  3. Weigh Options
  4. Make a Plan

 

Choosing a career is a big decision to make and high school seniors each year are stressing out about how to go about deciding their future. But deciding a career path doesn’t need to be too stressful.

 

Finding your passion is largely about self-awareness and researching all your options. By following the suggestions below you can decide your future career with ease.

 

Understand Yourself

girl looking up

 

Becoming more self-aware can be especially difficult for younger, high school students who are still figuring out so much about who they are.

 

But this journey into self-exploration can be fun and eye opening too! You want to discover and record your skills, interests, strengths, weaknesses, and passions.

 

Start exploring the things you love right now. This is the first part of the journey that leads you to a career you’ll love. You also want to know your values, or what you will and won’t do in a job.

 

This is where learning more about your personality type will come in handy. For instance, if you are more introverted, then working with customers may be on your list of things you don’t want in a job.

 

If you love being up on your feet then having a more hands-on job might be on your list of things you do want in a job.

 

Taking the Myers Briggs Personality Test might help you better understand key aspects of your personality.

 

If you have trouble finding these personal answers within yourself, there are some things you can do to find the answers.

 

Ask Yourself Questions

 

Giving yourself an introspective interview can really help learn more about yourself. Questions are good because they help you analyze yourself and what you do and don’t like.

 

It also helps you look at yourself more realistically. You may like the idea of being a lawyer, but you have to ask yourself if you are willing to do all that is necessary to become a lawyer, and if you’ll really be happy with the required daily tasks of a lawyer.

 

Questions help you see patterns and become more self-aware, which is paramount to finding a career path for you.

 

They also help you to know what you would like in a job (so you can accumulate a list of options) and what you wouldn’t like in a job (so you can cancel certain options out).

 

To conduct your introspective interview you can ask yourself the following questions, or you can have someone else ask them while you respond and talk about your answers together.

  • If I could choose one friend to trade jobs with, I’d choose __, because __.
  • I’ve always wondered what it would be like to do __. It’s interesting to me because __.
  • If I had the right education or skill set, I’d definitely try __, because __.
  • If I had to go back to school tomorrow, I’d major in __, because __.
  • My co-workers and friends always say I’m great at __, because __.
  • The thing I love most about my current job is __, because __.
  • If my boss would let me, I’d do more of __, because __.
  • If I had a free Saturday that had to be spent “working” on something, I’d choose __, because __.
  • When I retire, I want to be known for __, because __.

 

Take an Aptitude Test

 

There are lots of online career tests you can take. A career quiz will give you ideas about what fields and jobs that might be right for you.

 

You’ll be asked questions to determine your skills and interests. Then the test will pair your results with careers that best fit your answers.

 

You can then weigh these different options and research them to help you pick one. Below are two free tests you can take right now:

 

Research Options

research notebook

 

After you have some options in mind you can learn about your choices in order to make an informed final decision. Don’t only research specific jobs though. This can be really helpful, but think about broader fields of work as well.

 

There are fields of work and then there are jobs in those fields. Sometimes deciding a field of work first will help you find the specific job you’re looking for.

 

Types of Careers
  • Arts and Communication
  • Business
  • Education
  • Engineering
  • Humanities
  • Law and Government
  • Medical
  • Science
  • Social Services

 

Once you’ve decided on a career field, you can narrow your search down to a specific job in that field. Deciding which job to pick is easier if you read the requirements or the responsibilities for each job, and see if they interest you.

 

You can search actual job openings to find the most common real-world requirements involved. Indeed and ZipRecruiter are two popular job search websites where you can see real postings for the careers you’re interested in.

 

You can research other important aspects of the career by visiting PayScale.com.

 

This website has surveys about almost every profession imaginable, and can tell you things like average salary, what people on the high end of the job get paid vs the lower end. You can even search by your location and experience to assess how much you can expect to get paid.

 

They also list the skills that are most important to the field, the tasks and requirements involved, how people review the job, gender percentages in the field, and the health benefits you generally get.

 

It’ll even show you related jobs and jobs in your area and it’s all shown to you in pretty, simple graphics.

 

Do Internships and Job Shadowing

 

Internships and job shadowing can be a great way to get some hands-on experience with the careers you’re interested in. Often your school advisers can help you find internships and job shadowing opportunities near you.

 

Conduct an Informational Interview

 

If you don’t have the time for internships and job shadowing, you can conduct an informational interview. It’s like a reversed job interview.

 

You visit with someone who has the job you’re interested in, and you ask them a series of questions to get a feel for their job, what they did to get where they are, and any other insights or advice they might have for you.

 

Here are some example questions you could ask from the Berkeley University of California:

  • What are your main responsibilities as a…?
  • What is a typical day (or week) like for you?
  • What do you like most about your work?
  • What do you like least about your work?
  • What kinds of problems do you deal with?
  • What kinds of decisions do you make?
  • How does your position fit within the organization/career field/industry?
  • How does your job affect your general lifestyle?
  • What current issues and trends in the field should I know about/be aware of?
  • What are some common career paths in this field?
  • What kinds of accomplishments tend to be valued and rewarded in this field?
  • What related fields do you think I should consider looking into?
  • How did you become interested in this field?
  • How did you begin your career?
  • How do most people get into this field? What are common entry-level jobs?
  • What steps would you recommend I take to prepare to enter this field?
  • How relevant to your work is your undergraduate major?
  • What kind of education, training, or background does your job require?
  • What skills, abilities, and personal attributes are essential to success in your job/this field?
  • What is the profile of the person most recently hired at my level?
  • What are the most effective strategies for seeking a position in this field?
  • Can you recommend trade journals, magazines or professional associations which would be helpful for my professional development?
  • If you could do it all over again, would you choose the same path for yourself? If not, what would you change?
  • I’ve read that the entry-level salary range for this field is usually in the range of ______? Does this fit with what you’ve seen? (Don’t ask about the person’s actual salary.)
  • What advice would you give someone who is considering this type of job (or field)?
  • Can you suggest anyone else I could contact for additional information?

 

Weigh Options

crossroads

 

Now that you have a couple choices in mind, and have done your due diligence learning all about each one, you have to make a final decision.

 

When making this final decision about your future, it’s important that you keep certain things in mind.

 

Think about the future, retirement, the family life you want. Think about what you would like your life to be known for and any other long-term goals you may have for your life. Will this career choice help you reach those goals?

 

Make sure you take priority over what you want to do over any societal expectations pressed upon you. After all, you are the one who’s going to live with this career.

 

Make a Plan

calendar

 

If you’re graduating high school and starting college soon, then you’ll want to not only pick a college but a major, and possibly minor, that will be useful for the field you want to go into.

 

You can also start taking advantage of high school and college advisers and mentors if your school has a program like that. These counselors can act as career coaches to help you map out your career path.

 

In your research and studies you should figure out the steps, milestones, and requirements that people in your field must go through. Then you can plan these steps out in your own life.

 

Record these plans in a place or a calendar that you can easily revisit and adjust as needed. Plan is a great website that can connect to your gmail or outlook account to help you plan your future effectively in one easy to use space.

 

If you need some help planning financially, a Check City Personal Loan may be able to help you as well.

 

how to choose a career infographic

 

Whether you are a college freshman looking to decide on a career path for the first time, or a seasoned career veteran looking for your dream job, the process is going to look about the same.

 

By following this guidance you can learn more about yourself and discover what career path is the best for you, and find happiness and success in your professional life.


Sources


Indeed. “Guide: How to Choose a Career.”

The Balance Careers. “How to Make a Career Choice When You Are Undecided: 8 Steps to Choosing a Career,” by Dawn Rosenberg McKay.

How Much Money Do YouTubers Make?

How much do youtubers make?

Have you ever wondered how YouTubers can afford to spend all that time making viral videos?

Becoming a successful YouTube star may not be as easy as it sounds, but it is possible.

Explore this Article

YouTube has taken over the vlogging scene with full-force, creating a growing arena of self-employed, money-making vloggers. It’s easy to see why using YouTube’s platform has become such a lucrative business for some.

For instance, YouTube has become the second largest search engine in the entire world, and one of the most visited sites on the web. It has been estimated that all of us together spend a billion hours a day watching YouTube videos, and over 400 hours worth of videos are uploaded to YouTube every minute. youtube video genres YouTube has become such a giant generator of content that it has even developed its own list of genres, or “niches.”

YouTube Genres:

  • Gaming
  • Lifehacks
  • Gossip
  • News
  • Top [#] lists
  • Fail compilations
  • Food
  • Art
  • Product unwrapping and opening
  • How-to demonstrations
  • Animals
  • Spoofs
  • Online education course
  • Hauls

Facts about Earning on YouTube

To start off our understanding of how much YouTube stars can and do make, let’s take a look at some cold hard facts. The following are some lists of the top most successful YouTubers in the year 2015, 2017, and 2018 along with how much they earned that year:

youtube earnings chart

Needless to say, these are some impressive numbers. A lot of people would love to make these kinds of figures each year while being working from the comfort of their own home doing something they love. So how does it work? How do people make money on YouTube?

How YouTubers Make Money

There are many ways that YouTubers make money, and it’s often because they’re branching out, partnering with others, and creating a brand for themselves that goes beyond their YouTube channel alone. Below is a list of some of the most common ways YouTubers are making money:

1. Ads

There are 2 kinds of ads: Cost Per Thousand (CPM) ads pay you per thousand views and Cost Per Click (CPC) ads pay you each time someone clicks on the ad on your channel.

Your money goes to your AdSense account. You can direct deposit your earnings out of your AdSense account when there’s more than $100 in it.

2. Merchandizing

Many YouTubers end up making their own products like makeup, clothes, t-shirts, fan gear, and many others.

3. YouTube Partner Programs

When you are part of a YouTube Partner Program you can get paid for views and ads on your page. You can also access a large variety of content creation tools and get an opportunity to win prizes based on the number of views you have.

But you have to qualify for the program:

  • Your YouTube channel needs to reach 4,000 watched hours and 1,000 subscribers in the past 12 months.
  • You can apply for the membership anytime, but to get the top rated partner programs, you should have accumulated 15k of watched hours over the last 3 months.
4. Affiliate marketing

YouTubers can get paid to reference or recommend a product or service to their viewers. Online shopping sites will pay YouTubers a commission for any traffic or sales they get from the YouTuber referring viewers to their product.

They usually get paid based on how many people click the link to the product and how many people actually buy the product through that link. This can be done by a YouTuber in any of the following ways:

  • A video unboxing the product you are trying to sell
  • A video in which you recommend the product or service
  • A video reviewing the product
  • Links to the product in the video’s description
5. Sponsorships

A brand will sometimes pay YouTubers to create a video specifically about their product. Sometimes the brand will sponsor the entire YouTube channel and then the YouTuber has to use, recommend, or mention the product in every video. Sponsorships aren’t easy to get, and usually only come to YouTubers who have already made a name for themselves.

YouTubers can charge their sponsors anywhere from $10 to $50 per 1,000 views. So if the video hits 1 million views, then the YouTuber makes anywhere from $10,000 to $50,000 for that one video.

6. Crowdfunding or Patronage

Patreon is currently one of the most popular examples that online entrepreneurs like YouTubers use to make money off their craft.

By becoming a patron on patreon fans can get extra perks like extra content, behind the scenes footage, bloopers, and more.

7. Live engagements

Depending on what your YouTube channel is about you can also get paid to do live events, like speaking.

Why Doesn’t Everyone Become a YouTube Star?

youtube income

You may be thinking at this point about quitting your job and starting a YouTube channel of your own, but there are some cons to online self-employment. Yes, some YouTubers can make a lot of money from their branding and their channel, but MOST YouTubers don’t.

To put it in perspective, 90% of all YouTube views only go to a small 3% of YouTubers. Also, 97% of all aspiring YouTubers don’t make it across the U.S. poverty line ($12,140) with their YouTube channel earnings. Even if you do manage to make it to the top 3%, you’re looking at making an average of $16,800 a year, which is not very much.

Below are some other cons to remember before putting all your hopes on the success of a YouTube channel:

  • Advertisers don’t always pay very well.
  • Not all sponsorships are paid. Some come in the form of free goods or services instead.
  • YouTube takes 45% of what advertisers pay you.
  • Many YouTubers are a part of an agency or multi-channel network, and these partners will take a cut of your earnings too.
  • Personal costs for equipment or anything else you might need for your videos.
  • It takes a lot of your personal time to create quality content that will do well.

YouTubers can make money from their channels, but those who are actually successful at this are often branching out and making money in other ways as well. Their YouTube channel is often just one part of their larger brand. If you’re an aspiring YouTube star and need help with funds to get started, you can take advantage of the Check City Personal Loan and expand your brand as well. Isn’t it amazing that we live in a world where personal branding and creativity can allow so many a livelihood doing what they love?

READ MORE

Watch the Check City YouTube Channel!

Visit the Influencer Marketing Hub to see how much different YouTube stars made in 2015.

Visit the G2 Learning Hub to see their figures for how much different YouTube stars made in 2017.

Read Forbes’ article “Highest-Paid YouTube Stars 2018: Markiplier, Jake Paul, PewDiePie And More” to see how much different YouTube stars made in 2018.

Read the article “How Much Do YouTubers Make? (A Lot!)” to learn more about how YouTubers are making money.

How Much Do Nurses Make?

nurses pay

The nursing profession has been around for a very long time. Today there are over 100 different nursing specialties.

So the field not only offers a lucrative salary but a chance to specialize in what you are most passionate about as well. This article will take a closer look at the salary aspect of the Nursing profession.

Explore this Article

Everyone at some point has to figure out what to do with their life and what job to take. We all want a job that will make us happy, foster our passions, and provide for ourselves. If your passion includes helping people then the nursing profession may be the perfect career for you.

There are many reasons for becoming a registered nurse (RN) is a great career choice. For one thing, the registered nurse profession currently has an expected growth rate of 15%, which is much faster than the average job’s growth rate. So if you’re wondering if your job outlook as a future nurse is good or not, have no fear, the demand for nurses is only going to get higher.

A career as a registered nurse is a great option not only because of the future outlook, job security, and demand look good. It also only requires a bachelor’s degree, and the average salary for registered nurses is $71,730 a year! Not only that but the nursing profession has a vast array of subfields and specialties you can go into as well. No matter your temperament or passion you can bet that the nursing profession has a niche for you.

What Determines Pay?

nurses salary

According to the Bureau of Labor statistics RNs tend to make an average of $34.48 an hour. When calculating for annual salary, the lowest 10% was around $50,800 a year, the median annual salary was $71,730 a year, and the highest 10% was up to $106,530 a year.

Like all jobs, how much an RN makes is also going to depend on certain factors unique to that field. The variables that affect the salary of a registered nurse are:

What state you work in

Different states all have different average RN salaries. For example, RNs in Alabama have an average annual salary of $57,890, but RNs in California have an average annual salary of $102,700. Just keep in mind that these numbers often vary due to things like cost of living. Nurses may make more in California each year than nurses in Alabama, but the cost of living between these two states may differ greatly as well.

Level of education

There are 4 different levels of education that you can seek in the nursing field. All of which will require studies in nursing, physiology, anatomy, and nutrition. The higher your education level, the higher your starting salary at a job is going to be.

  1. Associates Degree in Nursing (ADN) takes 2-3 years.
  2. Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) takes 4 years.
  3. Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) takes 2 years.
  4. Doctorate in Nursing (DNP) takes 4 to 6 years.
Experience or how long you’ve been working as a nurse

The more experience you have working as a nurse the more your salary is likely to increase compared to nurses who are newer or haven’t worked as RNs for as long. The fact that experience and time spent in the job factors into salary is helpful because it means employers will recognize you for your experience and compensate you more for your time spent in the field.

But if you are new to the field and still only making that starting salary, you may need some help here and there to stay on track financially. If you find yourself needing some help during the month, you can use the Check City Payday Loan.

What Do Nurses Do?

What everyday tasks a nurse does will potentially depend on whether they are specializing in a specific field or not. But below are a couple of common RN duties to give you a feel for the kind of work that would be required of you on a daily basis:

  • Administer medications and treatments
  • Assist in examinations
  • Instruct patients on how to care for themselves after leaving a medical facility
  • Observe patients
  • Operate medical equipment
  • Perform tests
  • Record patient medical histories
  • Record symptoms
  • Supervise the Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs)
RN Hours:

Some patients are going to need around-the-clock care, so there will always need to be some RNs on duty. RNs usually take the 24 hours in shifts so that there are always nurses available in the day and night. This means that as an RN you may end up working nights, weekends, holidays, or be on call.

If you are interested in the work that RNs do but want to work more regular business hours, then there are some options available. There are places of work where RNs are needed but they only operate during normal business hours. Places like offices and schools will only require a regular work shift.

Nurse Related Jobs and Specialties

There are many nurse related jobs that are also worth considering if you are interested in this type of vocation. This is one of the perks of the nursing career. It has the potential to lead to other jobs, and it connects you to the medical career world in general.

There are also many different specialties within the nursing field. As you become a registered nurse you may find that a specific area of work interests you above the others, and if you want you can pursue that specific area of practice.

The following charts are just a few examples showing the range of salaries for some common nursing specialties. But there are over 100 different nursing specialties available in the medical field right now. Below we will continue to go over some of these other kinds of nurse specialties. For more information about different nursing specialties and what they do you can visit RegisteredNursing.org.

nursing specialties

Nurses hold some of the most important jobs in order to make a hospital function properly. They literally fill hundreds of rolls and perform a countless array of duties. If you are looking for a job that will allow you to live comfortably while letting you pursue your individual passions in the medical arena, then becoming a registered nurse is the ideal path for you.


Sources


US Bureau of Labor Statistics. “Registered Nurses.”

Nurse Salary Guide. “Nurse Salary by State 2020.”

Registered Nursing. “Nursing Careers & Specialties for RNs.”

Check City Blog. “What Do Nurses Do?”

Nurse.org Career Guide Series. “Registered Nurse.”

Nursing Community. “The 20 Best Nursing Career Specialties.”

4 SMART Goal Examples

SMART-Goal-Examples

We learn best by example, and that goes for understanding SMART goals and how to use them.

Explore this Article

  1. Professional Goals
  2. Fun Personal Goals
  3. Serious Personal Goals
  4. Financial Goals

By giving plenty of examples, you can use this goal making tool to your advantage and achieve all your personal and professional goals. You may have heard the acronym SMART goals by now, and you may be wondering what it means and how to use this tool to up your goal setting game.

What are SMART Goals?

SMART is an acronym that stands for Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-Bound. SMART is a mnemonic device that is meant to help you create “smarter” goals. The 5 elements of a SMART goal are the 5 key characteristics of an effective goal that you can actually achieve. So you want the goals you make to be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Specific

To make your goals specific enough, you want to answer the key “W” questions, who, what, when, where, why? You want to decide your goal and describe it in as much detail as possible. The key is to have a clearly defined picture of your goal in your mind, leaving no room for ambiguity.

Ask who, what, where, and any other details?

Measurable

Making your goal measurable is mainly making it so you have a measurable outcome to work toward, so you’ll know for certain when you are successful or not. So instead of just wanting to lose weight, figure out how many pounds you want to lose. If you want more Instagram followers, think about how many more followers you want. What you can measure is going to be different for each goal, but there is always something you can measure. Maybe you want to be happier, what are some measurable things you can keep track of that will show whether your plans are working? Maybe you can measure how many hours of sleep you get each night to see if you’re getting your full 8 hours each night, or record in a mood journal how you feel at certain times of the day for a couple weeks to try and find patterns.

Ask how?

Attainable

Just like when dealing with your finances you’ll want to determine whether the ROI is worth it. Each goal is going to take time and resources. Are they going to yield worth while results? Is the effort your goal would require doable? Maybe you want to run a marathon but you’ve never run before, so perhaps a better goal to start with would be to run 20 minutes every day. Sometimes you need to take your vision down a bit for a goal that you are actually able to do right now in your life.

What’s the level of attainability?

Relevant

Sometimes we feel pressured by our surroundings to make certain goals. Maybe your parents want you to be a doctor, but you want to be an English teacher. Maybe the people around you make you feel like you need to make intense dieting and weight goals to buff up or slim down, but you’re actually at a healthy bmi(link to how to gain weight on a budget post). Goals take time and effort, they come with their own costs, so above all your goals have to be made for you, by you. So when making a goal ask yourself what your motives are and make sure they’re good, worth it, will actually yield the results you desire.

Ask why?

Time-Bound

Time needs to be a major element in any goal you make. You need to create a plan that aligns with calendar dates and deadlines. Having a due date helps us stay focused, motivated, and kick us into action. Remember that it is here where you can bog yourself down if you’re not careful, so be flexible and plan smartly so you don’t overwhelm yourself. Don’t be afraid to adjust when you need to, sometimes learning your limits and what works best for you takes some trial and error.

Ask when?

SMART Goal Examples

There are different elements that make up our lives and thus there are different kinds of goals we can make for each aspect of our lives. There are the more formal, professional, and serious goals we need to make, and then there are personal and fun goals we want to make. Make goals for your more professional and serious successes, but set goals for yourself as well. Below are some key goal categories to remember:

1. Professional Goals

Specific: (ask who, what, where, and any other details) You want to wake up earlier for work each morning.

Measurable: (ask how) You record on a chart beside your bed every night you manage to go to bed at 10:30 pm. On a similar chart beside the door you mark each morning you are able to leave your house for work at 7:30 am.

Attainable: (what’s the level of attainability) Instead of making a goal to get to work by 7 each morning, you’ve started with a goal to get to work by 8 each morning, because you know working toward this goal is more feasible for you right now.

Relevant: (ask why) This goal is relevant for you because going to work earlier will allow you to leave earlier in the day, giving you more time for other goals and endeavors outside of work.

Time-Bound: (ask when) You’ve set alarms on your phone to remind you when to get ready for bed, and when to wake up and get ready for the day. You’ve decided to give yourself a month to get into this routine, and if you are successful, you’ll reward yourself to a Friday movie night with friends.
 
professional-goals
 

2. Fun Personal Goals

Specific: (ask who, what, where, and any other details) You want to make more friends in college.

Measurable: (ask how) You plan social events to go to every weekend this month and decide you have to stay at each for at least a full hour, and must talk to at least 3 people you don’t know. You record the events, how long you stayed, and who you befriended in your journal after each weekend.

Attainable: (what’s the level of attainability) You know you can attain this goal because there are social events you know you’ll be able to go to, and you have a roommate who is very social land willing to go with you to each event.

Relevant: (ask why) This goal is relevant to you because you’re a freshman in college and want to make friends in this new phase of your life. You know your overall wellbeing and happiness will increase by reaching this goal.

Time-Bound: (ask when) You have this month to enact your plan before reevaluating all the new people you met, and continuing with your goal by inviting some of those people to a social event at your own apartment at the beginning of the following month.
 
fun personal goals
 

3. Serious Personal Goals

Specific: (ask who, what, where, and any other details) You want to lose 10 pounds.

Measurable: (ask how) You’ll weigh yourself on a scale and record your weight progress on a chart.

Attainable: (what’s the level of attainability) This goal is attainable because you’ve spoken with your doctor and it is ok for you to lose 10 pounds. You also have a dietary and exercise plan that should yield results over time.

Relevant: (ask why) This goal is relevant to you because losing 10 pounds will put you at a healthier weight, give you more energy, and build your confidence.

Time-Bound: (ask when) You schedule regular weigh-in dates for the following weeks to come, and estimate that you should reach your weight loss goal in time for the beginning of summer.
 
serious personal goals
 

4. Financial Goals

Specific: (ask who, what, where, and any other details) You want to decrease your debts.

Measurable: (ask how) You know how much overall debt you have, and after sitting down with your budget you can reorganize your spending so you know exactly how much you can spend on debts and other spending each month. This will also tell you exactly how long it will take for you to pay it all off. You can keep a record of when you successfully make each payment, and visually see yourself getting closer to paying all of it.

Attainable: (what’s the level of attainability) You can know the attainability of this goal by how well you budget for spending more on debts and less on other varied expenses. If you ever need help reaching your financial goals and getting back on track you can take out a personal loan at Check City.

Relevant: (ask why) This goal is relevant because you have debt to get rid of, and getting rid of debt will free you to spend more on other things and save for the future.

Time-Bound: (ask when) You have a due date for your bills each month and by keeping on track with these monthly dates, you stay on track to finish paying off your debt in the months you’ve given yourself.
 
financial goals
 

Document Your Goals

In order to make sure your goals follow the SMART goal rules, it may help to record them on a chart or utilize a goal setting app. There are countless goal setting apps out there to help you track your habits and reach your aspirations. Here are some of the best goal setting apps for making SMART goals:

smart-goal-chart-printable
 
In some ways, goals are how we live our lives. It’s how we make decisions and enact change. Understanding the 5 key characteristics of SMART goal-making can help you level up in your personal and professional life, and more effectively plan for success. As a great artist once said:
 
“Our goals can only be reached through a vehicle of a plan, in which we must fervently believe, and upon which we must vigorously act. There is no other route to success.”

—Pablo Picasso



READ MORE
Read the section on SMART goals from YourCoach.
 
Read another Check City article about goal making by reading, “How to Set Goals.”

How to Set Goals

How-to-Set-Goals

We all make goals and we make them for many reasons. They can help us be productive in both our personal and professional lives.

Explore this Guide:

  1. Make the Main Goal
  2. Find the Goal’s Purpose
  3. Make a Detailed Plan
  4. Measure the Results
  5. Reward Yourself

But if you don’t know the key aspects of goal making than your efforts can seem pointless. By taking into mind the following key components of goal setting, you can successfully accomplish all your goals.

Why Make Goals?

Goals are how you decide to do something and the plan you take to achieve it. Goals consist of long term and short term goals. Sometimes your goal is a big picture, far in the future kind of goal, and other times your goal is closer to the present. Sometimes long term and short term goals can be seen as main goals and sub goals that lead you to your ultimate goal.
For instance, maybe you want to start a successful business, having a successful business would be your long term or ultimate goal. All of the tasks and accomplishments that are necessary for you to get to your ultimate goal are the short term goals or subtasks or steps necessary to achieve the main objective. One of those short term goals might be getting the papers for your business in order.

inspirational-quote-goals

Different Kinds of Goals

Goals don’t just have to be professional. You can make fun goals too! There are lots of formal, professional, and serious goals we need to make throughout our lives, but there are personal and fun goals we can be making along the way as well. Make goals for your more professional and serious successes, but set goals for yourself as well, like to get out every Friday, or to save up for a vacation this summer. You’ll also want to be making financial goals, like to save up for a new car, or spend less on entertainment this month. If you ever need help reaching your financial goals and getting back on track you can take out a personal loan at Check City.

  • Professional Goals (goals about work, or your own professional endeavors, hobbies, or talents)
  • Fun Personal Goals (goal to save up for vacation this summer)
  • Serious Personal Goals (goals to better your physical or mental health)
  • Financial Goals

What are SMART Goals?

SMART goals stands for Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-Bound. It is an acronym that describes the kind of goals you want to make. You want the goals you make to be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.
 
Don’t just make a blanket goal to lose weight, make a specific goal to lose 10 pounds.
Utilize a scale to measure your progress.
Plan to achieve your goal by formulating a new plan for your meals and exercise.
Make a plan to lose weight because this goal is relevant to your life, and will give you tangible health benefits.
Give yourself a timeline by planning dates for weigh-ins, with specific weight goals for each weigh-in date.

1. Make the Main Goal

Don’t have too many goals at one time. This may be difficult if you are creating a business, but that is why hiring dependable employees and delegating effectively and communicating well with each other is so important, especially in the beginning. If any one person in your project has too many goals they need to achieve they can have trouble focusing and end up not accomplishing anything very well. So delegate goals so that each person can have the most focus possible for their manageable set of goals. That way, each goal gets accomplished on time, and in the best way, done all the way and not incomplete or done poorly.

2. Find the Goal’s Purpose

Every goal needs a clear sense of purpose. You need to have a specific objective in order to effectively motivate yourself to achieve this goal. Yes you may want to have a successful business but why? Think about your reasons and write these down. Many successful businesses today made it big because they had a clear motivation behind all they do, and a lot of them end up sharing this in their company’s origination stories or in their company motto.

3. Make a Detailed Plan

When planning your goals you’ll want to list out a series of steps or subtasks, or sub-goals that are going to get you to your main goal. You want these steps to be very specific things you can really do. Be detailed so nothing important falls by the wayside. For instance, only saying “make print ads” may not be helpful. You also need to plan out how you’re going to make them, when they are due, and where they’re going to get posted, and who is in charge of getting the permissions to post them at each location. Right all these things out, plan out the times, the places, and the people involved.

4. Measure the Results

Keep track of how you’re doing. If the steps you have in your plan aren’t giving measurable results than you can change your plan.

5. Reward Yourself

Sometimes an extra motivator or benefit is helpful when reaching your goals. In life we always like to have good things to look forward to, so feel free to reward yourself when you reach your goals. There are many healthy ways you can reward yourself. You can reward yourself with food, like a celebratory dinner, or a favorite dessert. You can also reward yourself by going shopping and buying yourself a gift. It doesn’t have to be expensive either. Activities like fun outings, a movie or spa night, can also be great ways to reward yourself for achieving something.

 

goal-chart-printable

Create a Goal Workspace

It can also help to have a place where you write all these things down. Some even find it helpful to hang up your planned goals where you can see them every day. It can also help to place your plans in the most relevant place. For example, if your goal is about losing weight it would make sense to keep your goal chart in the kitchen, or near your treadmill. If your goal is about work then you’ll want to keep your goal chart in your workspace.

  • Put your goals on a calendar. With a calendar you can easily outline the dates of your plan.
  • Put your goals on a template, or chart. With a chart you can keep track of your progress levels and check off items once you’ve finished sub-goals.
  • Use an app. There are countless apps out there to help you track your habits and reach your aspirations. Here are some of the best goal setting apps:

Daylio is a great app for journaling and tracking your moods. It is also one of the most customizable apps, and allows you to track anything you want. It has a pleasing design, icons, and color palettes.

Loop is another great app for tracking. With Loop you can easily see all your goals and their progress in one place.

ATracker has some nice calendar and task features.

TickTick is a great goal app for groups or partners. You can sync and share tasks and goals with other people. There’s also a function to help you focus on certain tasks.

In some ways, goals are how we live our lives. It’s how we make decisions and enact change. Knowing how to properly set goals can help you level up in your personal and professional life. As Les Brown once said, “Your goals are the road maps that guide you and show you what is possible for your life.”

READ MORE

Learn more about setting goals by reading, “How to Set Goals the Easy Way.”

Read more about SMART goals and how this acronym applies to your personal life by reading, “Personal Goal Setting: Planning to Live Your Life Your Way.”

Budgeting in 4 Easy Steps

budget

No matter your financial situation in life, everyone needs a budget. With a budget, you can plan for needed expenses and prepare for the things you want!

In fact, the most simple budget only needs a couple of lists, a calculator, and some goals. Below are the main points our post will go over to help you set up your budget:

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Budgets are an important tool in anyone’s financial arsenal. Budgets can help you organize your needed expenses, like rent and bills, prepare for emergencies and get ready for whatever your future might hold. By knowing how to budget you can learn to stop living paycheck to paycheck and start building up your savings. it can help you save up for big expenses or future life events like a wedding, starting a family, buying a car or a house or moving to a new state.

Budgeting can also help you save for retirement, something else that even younger people just starting out on their own sometimes forget to think about but should. But most of all it can grant you financial power and freedom and help you provide for your wants and needs. But for those just starting out on their own especially, it can be hard to know where to begin.

There are several key elements you’ll need to include in your budget. You need to think about all your necessary expenses and plan them out accordingly so you are aware of how much of your monthly income you need to spend each month no matter what. Then you’ll have to think about unnecessary expenses. This is where you have the most freedom to plan out the numbers and make adjustments.

budget-template

How to Budget

There are many ways to budget and there is a lot of advice out there in the financial spheres about how to do it. You can also choose to plan for certain events by making a specific wedding budget, or for major purchases like car payments. But if you’re making a simple budget for yourself, then the main thing you’ll want to decide first is whether you want to make a monthly or yearly budget. Most people like to create a yearly one to get a general big picture view of their financial goals and future plans. But, a monthly one is more helpful for everyday use. We’re going to try and condense all that down to the bare bones minimum of what every smart budget needs.

#1: List your monthly income

List out all your forms of income. This would include the paychecks from your job, but also any extra money you make from any of your side hustles. Here is also where you can decide whether you want to organize your finances for gross income or net income.

Gross income is simpler and easier to calculate. You just need to know how much you get paid and use that money for your calculations.

Net income isn’t as simple to figure out but there are advantages to using it. You figure out your net income by looking up what the income tax is in your state, and taking out that percentage from your gross income. Using net income instead of gross income is perhaps better because it more realistically reflects what you will actually receive from your paycheck.

#2: List your fixed expenses

After you have all your sources of income written down you’ll want to form another list for all your fixed expenses. Fixed expenses are the expenses you have each month that doesn’t fluctuate in amount. Everyone’s list is going to look different depending on what expenses do and don’t apply to you, but here is an example list of some fixed expenses:

  • Rent or Mortgage: A calculation you’ll want to do when looking at your housing expenses is to check that your total housing expenses aren’t over 28% of your monthly gross income.
  • Insurance
  • Debts: A calculation you’ll want to do when looking at your debts is to check that your total debts aren’t over 36% of your monthly gross income.
  • Loans
  • Student loans
  • Credit card payments
  • Streaming services like Netflix, Hulu, and Spotify
  • Phone bill
  • Medication you pay for each month
  • Child support
  • Education

After you’ve listed all your fixed expenses total the amount, subtract it from your monthly income, and that’s what you have left to spend on varied expenses . . .

#3: Set up your savings

Before we go into varied expenses though, let’s take a moment to think about your savings and retirement. Get a savings account if you don’t have one already, and set aside a portion of what’s leftover after fixed expenses. Any amount you can afford to put away into a savings account each month will set you up for success in the long term, even if it’s only 5 to 10 dollars a month.

Aside from general savings and saving for retirement, you also want to set money aside in an emergency fund. It’s recommended that you have at least 3 months’ worth of your fixed expenses put away into an emergency fund at all times.

Digit is a great app you can use to help you plan and organize all your savings.

#4: List and portion out your varied expenses

Everyone’s list of varied expenses is going to look different depending on what expenses do and don’t apply to you. Varied expenses are any expenses that are going to fluctuate in amount each month, or are considered more like luxury expenses than needed ones.

Varied expenses are a big reason to do a budget in the first place so that your varied expenses each month don’t overtake your more important fixed expenses and your savings. Here are some examples of varied expenses you might need to consider:

  • Groceries
  • Eating out
  • Entertainment
  • Gas and transportation
  • Recreation
  • Clothes
  • College textbooks

Another way to figure out the reality of what you’re spending on varied expenses is to look at your transaction history for the month and see 1) How much in total you were spending on varied expenses that month, and 2) What those varied expenses were on. Do this for a couple of months back to get a more realistic idea of what you are spending on varied expenses each month.

Organizing your varied expenses is where you have the most control over your budget. Whatever is left over after your fixed expenses and your monthly payments to your savings account is what you have to spend on all your other spending for the month.

Here is where you will list out what all those varied expenses might be and portion what you have left in the budget into them. Remember that you don’t necessarily want to portion out 100% of what’s left into these categories so that you can accumulate a comfortable cushion in not just your savings account but your checking account as well.

Budgeting Tips

Invest

Making investments is a great way to beef up your financial portfolio. There are probably a trillion ways to invest, but the idea behind investments is that you put money into something that will give you more money in return later. This is called compounding interest.

interest-rate

A helpful tip to remember when going into any investment is the rule of 72. This rule means that if you take 72 divided by the interest rate you’ll figure out the estimated number of years it will take for your interest to double your initial investment.

Personal Capital and Acorns are some of the most helpful investing apps you can use to step up your investment game.

Where should I put my budget?

Figuring out where to even put your budget can get complicated. You can use excel or make your own table in Word or Google Docs or any note-taking program of your choice. There are also many free budget templates online that you can print out and use. Budget tools are all around if you take the time to look and decide on which ones best suit your needs.

Click here for a free budget worksheet from the Federal Trade Commission.

You can also use budgeting apps to keep track of all your bills, expenses, plans, and goals. Some of these apps even allow you to connect your budget to your financial accounts.

Control your spending

Sometimes it can be difficult to control your varied expenses throughout the month and track your spending. You can make controlling how much you spend each month easier by using a prepaid debit card. With a prepaid debit card, you put money on it like a gift card to yourself almost. You can also use a similar method of spending control by just taking money out and only using that cash for your varied expenses each week.

PocketGuard is an app that can help you track your purchases.

Get a Side Gig

Getting an extra source of income can really come in handy. There are a million different kinds of side hustles any ambitious person these days can get into. You can babysit, drive for uber, or sell your own products. The possibilities are endless and it never hurts to have a little extra money each month.

Plan to Decrease Debts

Debt can be a real financial weight on your shoulders, but it can also be a necessary evil in order to get a house, get a car, get through college, and much more. Decreasing the amount of debts you owe can still help alleviate some of that weight and provide more financial comfort and peace of mind.

So it’s important to budget with paying down your debts in mind. You can pay down debts quicker by planning to spend more on that fixed/necessary expenses each month, by spending less on varied expenses, or by getting another job to provide more income to put into your debts each month.

Budgeting doesn’t have to be hard. All you really need is 4 lists and a calculator! Everyone should practice using a budget now so that you can control your finances instead of your finances controlling you.

READ MORE

Check out some of other Check City articles on budgeting:
Budgeting for Dummies

What is a Budget?

Budgeting Tips You May Not Have Thought of Before

3 Simple Tips to Building a Budget

Ways to Keep Track of Your Spending


7 Tips for Workplace Wellness

tips for workplace wellness

In order to take good care of your work you first have to take good care of yourself. Taking care of your well-being will not only help you in life, but it will help you in the office as well.

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  1. Get Quality Sleep
  2. Fuel Your Body Effectively
  3. Exercise
  4. Prevent Eye Strain
  5. Decorate Your Desk
  6. Learn to Unwind
  7. Have Pursuits Outside of Work

Believe it or not, but even an office job can have its own hazards. You may not think about it but everything from vending machine food and sitting all day can cause serious health problems. But don’t worry, there are plenty of ways to combat these workplace hazards and increase office wellness. This can mainly be done by having a work-life balance. Everyone always seems to be talking about having a good work-life balance, but what does this balance really mean? Ultimately your wellness at work is about taking care of your physical and mental health.

Take Care of Your Body

physical well-being

Get QUALITY Sleep

Sleep is a factor that greatly affects your performance throughout the day as well as your physical and mental well-being. But it isn’t enough to just go to bed and hope for the best. You don’t just want enough sleep you want quality sleep. There are ways you can optimize your sleep so that you are getting the most out of your nights.

Go to bed and wake up at the same time

This will help your body to adjust to a regular schedule. Once your body is used to this schedule falling asleep each night and waking up each morning will become much easier. Set an alarm or reminder for when you need to start getting ready for bed to help you learn to wind down at the same time each night.

Stay hydrated

You actually get dehydrated as you sleep which can cause a dry and hoarse throat in the morning, leg cramps during the night, and an overall lack of quality sleep. You lose hydration in the night through breathing or a dry or warm environment in your bedroom. Another thing that can cause night dehydration is exercising late in the evening. To combat this issue, hydrate yourself well throughout the day, keep a water bottle on your nightstand, and keep your room temperature on the colder side with a humidifier turned on while you sleep.

Fuel Your Body EFFECTIVELY

Your body is like a complicated machine and in order to work at top performance levels and feel its very best your body needs fuel that it can work with. There are a lot of foods out there today that might be quick, easy, and immediately filling, but they won’t provide your insides with the proper nutrients to function at full capacity and eventually you’ll feel this as you feel more and more lethargic throughout the workday. You can fuel your body with a lot of things, but only certain nutrients will give you effective nourishment to give you optimal health and energy.

Eat wholesome meals

Make healthy meals at home and take healthy meals with you to work. Many of your coworkers might be going out to eat every day and though this might be fun in the short term it probably isn’t beneficial in the long term. Healthy homemade lunches will improve your physical wellness and improve your spending! You can also start bringing in healthier treats for your coworkers to help improve workplace wellness as a whole.

Eat wholesome snacks

If your stomach is growling for the majority of the day, you will likely crash before the end. Make sure you have the right nourishment going into your body and it will pay off. Even simple snacks can help keep you going between meals. Nuts, fruits, and cut up vegetables can really give you the energy you need to make it through the day.

Cut down on sugars

One of the biggest issues office workers fight on a typical workday is lethargy. Sugar intake can be one of the major contributing factors to your lethargy. Take note of the sugar content of what you are consuming in a regular day and you’ll see how prevalent this ingredient has become in a lot of our foods.

Then remember, while you pick your foods each day, that each gram of sugar adds to unpleasant feelings like bloating and tiredness. Make sure you take these tips to heart in order to keep your body happy and healthy throughout the workday and throughout your life. You will be grateful when you still have energy after retirement!

Stay hydrated

You would be shocked to know how much staying hydrated can improve your workplace wellness. There is nothing more important than drinking enough water throughout the day. It doesn’t matter whether it is summer or winter, your body is made up mostly of water and you need to continually replenish it. Don’t wait till you are thirsty to start drinking. It is much better to have a set amount that you plan on drinking throughout the day.

In general it is advised that you drink 8 glasses of water a day. It can help to have a designated water bottle that you keep with you throughout the day to drink from. If you have trouble getting yourself to drink enough water each day try drinking with a reusable straw. This can make drinking enough liquids faster and easier. Another thing you can do is put things in your water to make drinking water more fun! You can add cut up fruits and vegetables, mint leaves, and many other things to your water to make staying hydrated healthy, tasty, and fun.

Exercise

Exercise may seem like a dauntingly intense habit to get into, but it’s actually one of the easiest ways to boost your well-being because any amount of it will help. Even if you only go out of your way to exercise 20 minutes on weekdays, that’s still better than no exercise at all.

The average person is advised to get 75 to 150 minutes of physical activity into each week. This averages out to be around 30 minutes a day. Thirty minutes really isn’t asking too much of your time and there are a million ways you can get this 30 minutes of physical activity into your day without having to do crazy intense workout sessions at the gym. You can simply go on a walk, plan a hike for the weekend, go swimming, biking, or take a physical class like dancing or yoga.

Put Exercise on the Agenda

You can implement a routine of exercise into your day before or after work. Getting yourself to exercise will be easier if you schedule it into a specific time of day. In fact, a study found that working out at the same time each day made exercise more effective.

Work Out at Work!

You can also find ways to grab some exercise while you’re at work! There are hundreds of exercises you can do at your desk. Everything from simple stretches to replacing your chair with a stability ball can greatly improve your health.

Whatever you choose to do, change things up and get your body moving as much as possible. By the end of the day when most of your coworkers are crying about sore backs and tired limbs, you will be ready to keep going with your day.

Office Friendly Exercises

  • Practice good posture
  • Leg raises
  • Chair dips
  • Use weights at your desk
  • Ab workouts with your swivel chair, or stability ball
  • Lean on your desk to do planks or pushups
  • Use a standing desk
  • Go for a walk around the building
  • Take the stairs instead of the elevator

Prevent Eye Strain

If you work in an office chances are you also get a lot of screen time at work. Staring at screens all day can put a strain on your eyes and even cause headaches and nausea after a while. But you can help prevent eye strain by getting a blue light filter on your screen, or blue light filter glasses to wear at work. It is also a good idea to take a break or two from your screen while at work to give your eyes a rest.

Take Care of Your Mind

mental well-being

Decorate Your Desk

Decorating your desk will make you happier, and liven up your workspace. You can get plants, you can set up some photos, you can decorate with cool looking bulletins and white boards, or splurge on a special mug or thermos just for your desk.

Learn to Unwind

You don’t have to pay for an expensive spa to still have your own personal spa day. There are endless things you can do to unwind and everyone relaxes in different ways. For some people relaxing may include hanging out with friends and going out. For others, relaxing may mean staying home, taking a warm bath, watching TV, or reading a good book. In order to learn how to unwind you need to learn more about yourself and what relaxation techniques work best for you.

  • Learn about mediation
  • Keep a journal
  • go outdoors
  • listen to music
  • have a spa night
  • read a book

Have Pursuits Outside of Work

It will give you a special sense of accomplishment to have your own personal pursuits outside of your job. And if you need help with funds to make your club or go on a weekend getaway you can use a Check City Personal Loan!

  • Volunteer
  • Join a book club
  • Start your own group or club
  • Join a recreational or intermediate sports team
  • Make personal goals
  • Plan vacations and getaways
  • Take a class

Having workplace wellness is all about having a work-life balance. Having a work-life balance is all about taking care of both your body and mind. If you remember these key principles of taking good care of yourself than not only will your life and health improve, but you will actually become more successful and productive at work as well!

READ MORE

Read “Workplace Wellness” from Mental Health America (MHA) to learn more ways you can improve the overall well-being of your employees.

Read an NPR report about how effective wellness programs are in the article, “How Well Do Workplace Wellness Programs Work?

Read an article from Corporate Wellness Magazine called, “What is Workplace Wellness Really? “ to learn more about what workplace wellness means.

For more tips about workplace wellness, see our article, “How to Stay Healthy at Work.”


How to Change Careers | The Ultimate Career Shift Guide

man on a busy street

Learn how to change careers and stand out from all the other eager job candidates when changing careers.

Explore this Guide:

 

According to the United States Department of Labor (DOL), people change careers 3 to 7 times during their lifetime.

 

One study done by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) found that younger baby boomers (born between 1957 and 1964) changed jobs 11.7 times in their lifetime.

 

But, there is a stigma around hopping jobs too much that can sometimes keep people at jobs they hate or that offer no opportunities to grow your career. It can be important to be loyal and dependable as an employee, but at the end of the day, you have to keep you and your career’s best interests at heart.

 

How to Prepare for a Career Shift

 

A career shift is a big change for both your personal and professional life. It can be extremely stressful.

 

Try not to rush into a career shift too quickly. Take adequate time to weigh your options and decide what you do and don’t want out of a career shift.

 

Before actually shifting careers, sit down and form some concrete plans. This can help direct you through this big life change and increase your chances of success.

 

Reasons for a Career Change

 

There are many reasons to make a career change. Maybe you want to go back to school and enter an entirely new field of work. Maybe you are moving and need to find a new job in a new area. Or maybe you are looking to make a refreshing change in your professional life.

 

A LinkedIn survey of over 10,000 people found the following to be the main reasons people gave for wanting a career change:

 

Career Advancement

 

45% of the LinkedIn survey participants said they were changing careers for career advancement.

 

This can happen when higher job positions aren’t available at your current place of work or because you need more certifications or education in order to advance in a job position.

 

Dissatisfied with Management

 

41% of participants said they wanted to switch careers because they were dissatisfied with the management at their current job.

 

Managers at work have a lot of impact on an employee’s quality of life at work. If you don’t get along with management, or the leadership at work leaves something to be desired, it could be time to find a new place of work.

 

Work Culture

 

36% of participants said they were looking for a different work culture that better suited their wants and needs.

 

This could be because a previous job’s work culture was harmful or not the right fit.

 

New Challenges

 

36% of participants said they were switching careers because they were looking for a new challenge.

 

We can start to feel stagnant doing the same thing for too long. And some jobs just don’t offer enough diversity and change.

 

Becoming too complacent and automatic at a job can also start to dull our skills and weaken the quality of our work. A new job that offers new opportunities and more diversity can help keep us from becoming complacent at work and help keep our skills sharp and up to date.

 

Better Compensation or Benefits

 

34% of participants were changing careers for better pay or benefits. Income is an important factor in the quality of your life. Sometimes it is necessary to consider a career change to better pay for your wants and needs.

 

74% of people who change careers got higher pay at their new jobs. Making a career change usually does result in better pay.

 

Lack of Recognition

 

32% of survey participants said they didn’t feel like their work was valued at their previous job.

 

You need to go where you and your work are valued. Having your work properly recognized at a job is also important in getting promotions, raises, and other career advancements and opportunities.

 

When is the Right Time for a Career Switch?

 

One of the hardest parts of switching careers is figuring out when it’s the right time to switch careers.

 

You can start by determining whether any of the top reasons for changing careers apply to you:

  • You want to advance your career or get a higher position.
  • You are dissatisfied with the work culture at your current job and want to find a work environment that suits you better.
  • You feel bored or antsy at work and crave new challenges.
  • You don’t get paid enough at your current job.
  • There aren’t enough benefits at your current job.
  • You feel like you and your work are undervalued at your current job.
  • There’s a different field of work you are now interested in pursuing.

 

If any of these items sound familiar to you then it might be time to consider a career switch. But it’s also important to consider the timing in your own personal life.

 

Ask yourself whether your personal life is ready right now to tackle all of the adjustments a career change includes.

 

How to Change Careers

 

Changing careers can be a stressful and time-consuming process. Because of that, you need to have a solid plan of action. This will help you not lose sight of your purpose in your career-changing efforts.

 

1. Figure Out What You Want

 

The first thing you need to do when considering a career change is to figure out what you do and don’t want in a job.

 

This is the time to take steps to figure out what career you really want. Read “How to Choose a Career” to reassess your career desires and goals and figure out what you really want to be doing.

 

Changing careers can be stressful. Don’t rush into the first opportunity that comes your way. Take adequate time to figure out what you want and make plans so your career change can be successful and stress-free.

 

2. Make Career Changing Plans

 

Having a clear career change purpose in mind will help you make career-changing plans that will bring you success.

 

Everyone’s career-changing plans are different. For some people, this means going back to school. For others, this could mean taking a single course to get certified in something that can further your career.

 

Once you know where you want to go in your career, make a scheduled plan that includes all the steps you need to take to get there.

 

3. Sharpen Basic Job Skills

 

Regardless of whether you need to further your education or not to change careers, it’s always a good idea to sharpen your basic job skills.

 

Read this master list of 15 Essential Skills for Your Resume to get an idea of the top job skills you need in any job.

 

For a more condensed list, here are the most important basic job skills:

 

Teamwork Skills

 

Working well in groups and teams is an important skill to have for any job. Even if you aren’t frequently working with others at your job, there’s still a chance you’ll have to communicate and collaborate with others at some point.

 

Being a good team player also lends itself to other useful job skills.

 

Communication Skills

 

All jobs require a level of communication. In fact, work from home jobs can actually require more communication skills because remote workers have to use more channels of communication.

 

Problem Solving Skills

 

Problem-solving, critical thinking, and analytical skills are also important in every job. Each job presents employees with different problems, tasks, and objectives that use critical thinking skills to solve.

 

4. Learn New Job Skills

 

If you’re making a drastic career change, this might include going back to school or seeking out courses or certifications for the field or position you want to move to.

 

Even if you don’t need further education to pursue a career switch, there are bound to be new job skills your new career will require.

 

When you switch to a new career you’ll probably be inexperienced compared to your new peers. You can make up for this inexperience by learning as much about your new career as possible.

 

Don’t wait around to dive deep into research and training. If you need a specific certification, seek it out. Read trade publications, follow blogs from industry experts, or attend a trade show or convention. Try to get an insider’s knowledge of your new industry, because it will help when you transition into making it your full-time career.

 

5. Update Your Resume and Cover Letters

 

After all that hard work it’s finally time to update your resume and cover letters for your new career.

 

It is crucial that you update your resume and cover letter with each new job application. By tailoring each resume and cover letter to each job, you’ll give yourself the best chance to impress interviewers and land the job.

 

To update your resume, keep in mind the specific skills and qualifications that your new industry will be looking for.

 

To update your cover letter, try to briefly illustrate the experiences you have that give you the skills and qualifications an interviewer is looking for in your new career.

 

Read How to Write a Cover Letter and How to Write a Resume to learn more about how to create a resume and cover letter that will lead you to success.

 

How to Change Careers at 30

 

At age 30, most likely you’ve been working for about 10 years. That’s enough to truly experience all aspects of the career you chose.

 

That doesn’t mean you won’t realize after 10 years in the field that there are some serious career changes you’d like to make.

 

Now is a good time to reexamine your career, what led you to it, and what exactly you would like to change. At this point, it’s also a good idea to evaluate the professional network you’ve accumulated so far.

 

This network will be paramount in changing careers at 30.

 

Top 5 Careers to Change to in your 30’s:
 

  1. Dental Assistants are important members of the dental team. Each dental assistant can have their own specializations in how they assist dentists. They may help with preparing and organizing dental tools, keep patient records, and help schedule appointments.
  2.  

  3. Veterinary Technicians are similar to assistants in that they are the assistants to the veterinarians they work for. They help do many of the technical jobs like administering certain treatments.
  4.  

  5. Personal Trainers create personalized fitness programs for their clients. They also often help coach their clients through the program.
  6.  

  7. Massage Therapists have a knowledge of the body, muscles, and tissues. They use their skills to massage muscle and tissue to relieve pain, stress, and improve circulation.
  8.  

  9. Business Managers supervise and lead business operations. They perform many important tasks like creating business strategies, evaluating business and employee performance, and leading teams.

 

top careers to change to in your 30s infographic

 

How to Change Careers at 40

 

At 40, most likely you’ve been in the field for about 20 years. You might be hesitant to go back to school to change careers at this stage, but it’s not too late!

 

Many career changes don’t require more than 2 years of additional schooling. Some don’t even require more than a year of courses and certifications to enhance the education section of your resume.

 

Changing careers at 40 can be stressful, as it can be at any time in life. But at 40, you should have plenty of past work experience to use in getting into a new job.

 

Top 5 Careers to Change to in your 40’s:
 

  1. Teachers educate a classroom of students in a wide range of topics. As a teacher, you can choose to specialize in teaching a certain age group or a certain topic.
  2.  

  3. Translators are knowledgeable in one or more languages. They help to translate languages that are written or spoken.
  4.  

  5. Dieticians and nutritionists have a knowledge of nutrition and the human body. They use this knowledge to customize a healthy meal plan for their client.
  6.  

  7. Social Workers work with children and families. They protect children that are vulnerable and support families who are struggling. They help solve relational problems along with many other everyday issues and hardships that families experience.
  8.  

  9. Human Resources Managers work closely alongside the employees at a company. They work in the hiring process and make sure compliance and employee guidelines are being adhered to in the workplace.

 

top careers to change to in your 40s infographic

 

How to Change Careers at 50

 

There are a lot of reasons to change careers at 50. One of the most common reasons is to find work that you are particularly passionate about. This work can then be carried on into your retirement years.

 

Changing careers at 50 comes with a lot of advantages. You will have past work experience to bolster your resume and a wide professional network to work with as well.

 

Top 5 Careers to Change to in your 50’s:
 

  1. Real Estate Agents are versed in the entire home buying and selling process. They then help prospective home buyers visit different available homes and go through the home buying process. Homeowners selling their home get help from real estate agents in going through the home selling process.
  2.  

  3. Financial Advisors helps their clients create effective financial strategies and plans. They help calculate the numbers, weigh the pros and cons, and consider the possible returns on investments. They help their clients invest, save, get out of debt, and build wealth.
  4.  

  5. Counselors can serve in many capacities. Counselors might work in almost any professional field or any age group. Some counselors work in a school district and help provide academic guidance to students.
  6.  

  7. Nurses perform a wide variety of duties in doctor offices and hospitals. Some of those tasks include administering medications, inserting IVs, or recording medical information about patients.
  8.  

  9. Freelance Writers can work from home writing content for their clients. They might write articles, larger works, or create content for a website.

 

top careers to change to in your 50s infographic

 

In Conclusion,

 

These tips on how to change careers are the 5 key steps you need to successfully navigate a career change.

 

When you’re going through a career transition and you’re in need of some fast cash, just step into a Check City Location near you to take advantage of our friendly financial services!



Sources


TED Talk. “What I learned from 100 days of rejection,” by Jia Jiang.

MayoClinic.org. “Job burnout: How to spot it and take action.”

Business LinkedIn. “New Research Reveals the Real Reason People Switch Jobs (and It isn’t Money or Their Boss),” by Allison Schnidman.

The Balance Careers. “How Often Do People Change Careers?” by Dawn Rosenberg Mckay.

New Year, New Job

Perhaps one of your New Year’s resolutions is to get a better income this upcoming year. This probably means finding a better job (or a job at all) this January. If you are thinking about switching jobs or need help finding your first job after December graduation, here are few tips to help you succeed!

Fix Up Your Resume

First of all, you’ll want to make sure your resume looks the best that it can. That doesn’t mean lie – you should NEVER fabricate or exaggerate information on you resume. Update your resume with the most recent activities, accomplishments, and contact information. Make sure it is clear, easy to read, succinct, and informative. You may need to tweak your resume for each job, highlighting past experiences or skills that are most applicable to the needs of the job. If you need help, advisement centers at your college might offer free services to alumni, or many cities also offer free resume consultation.

Always Build Experience

Get experience anywhere you can. This can mean full-time jobs, but also part-time jobs, volunteer opportunities, internships, shadowing, informational interviews, and other forms of networking. Don’t discount any opportunity that has taught you a skill, principle, or more about any given industry.

Follow Directions

When you are applying for jobs, especially online, make sure you follow the application instructions EXACTLY. Do not provide unwanted information or leave out anything they asked for. Many companies eliminate any candidates that have not followed their instructions accurately.

Apply Promptly

Apply as soon as you can. Don’t put off sending in resumes or spend weeks putting together a portfolio or cover letter. Often times, companies will simply take the first suitable candidate they have. Take a little time to write a proper cover letter, free of spelling or grammatical errors, but try not to waste any unnecessary time.

Apply Everywhere

Getting a job is not easy. Apply everywhere you can. Don’t worry about minor issues such as preferred skills or desired backgrounds (the key words being preferred and desired, not required). If you think you can do what they are asking, or at least learn how to do it in a timely manner, go for it! If it’s ok with you, you may also disregard location, starting dates, and other factors.

Practice Interviews

Sooner or later, you will probably be offered a chance for an interview. Practice answering common questions and prepare questions of your own. You can find a list of common interview questions online or come up with any you think they might ask.

This will help shake off the nerves and arm you with well-thought-out answers. Practice looking and feeling both comfortable and confident. Avoid excessive pride or humility, as well as extreme chattiness or shyness. Go in with the attitude of “this is what I can do for you,” not “what can you do for me.” No one likes hiring selfish people. You can find additional interview tips online.

If you feel like a new job and a pay raise is in order this New Year, work hard and you can achieve it!

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